Archive for Lean Manufacturing – Page 3

Value Stream Mapping Training

Course Outline
Course Objectives

Intended Audience

Quality professionals, engineers, marketing, managers and supervisors.

Time To Complete

2 hours (0.2 CEUs)

What Is Value Stream Mapping?

A value stream is another term for a process that has inputs, performs work on those inputs, and generates an output that has added value. The basic premise of a value stream is that value is added as goods or services stream through the process. Unfortunately, some actions, task, and activities continued within most all value streams do not add value; those non-value-adding task or activities represent waste in the process or value stream.

Mapping the value stream creates a visual representation of the value stream that helps point out the waste contained within the process flow. A value stream represents all of the activities and tasks needed to produce a product. Value streams start with the source of raw materials, flow through the internal processes and continue with the delivery of the product to customers.

Value Stream Mapping Online Training

In this targeted online training, learners will gain an understanding of the purpose of conducting a value stream analysis and what a value stream map is.  Steps to streamline a value stream from current state to future state are presented.

This Training Enables Learners To…

  • Describe the purpose of a Value Stream Map.
  • Identify the key components of a Value Stream Map.
  • Explain the key steps in developing the Future State Map.
  • Work as a productive member of a team tasked with conducting a value stream analysis.

Recommended Prerequisites

  • None.

You May Also Be Interested In…

  • 5S’s Workplace Organization – Comprehensive training in the concepts and application of the 5S’s (Sort, Set in Order, Shine, Standardize and Sustain) and how to apply these techniques on the job.
  • Lean for Business Processes – Online training that provides learners with a comprehensive understanding of how Lean Manufacturing works in a transaction-based/non-manufacturing business or job function.
  • Mapping Office Workflows – Targeted training in various techniques to map workflows in non-manufacturing environments.

Value Stream Mapping Course Outline

Lesson 1 | Value Stream Analysis

  • Defining what the Value Stream is and why is should be mapped.
  • How to use process flow mapping symbols to show the flow of the process – both the current state and the desired future state.

Lesson 2 | Streamlining the Value Stream

  • Using the Value Stream Map to understand sources of waste and then to conduct a work analysis and then to create a macro workflow and finally a micro workflow.
  • Focus on the characteristics of a lean value stream and how to build those into the future state.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner’s progress in this course.

Value Stream Mapping Course Objectives

  • Describe the purpose of a Value Stream Map.
  • Identify the key components of a Value Stream Map.
  • Explain the key steps in developing the Future State Map.
  • Understand the purpose of streamlining the value stream.
  • Describe the steps to streamline a workflow.
  • Identify the key characteristics of a lean value stream.
  • Compare and contrast the difference between a macro and micro workflow.
  • Describe the impact of a bottleneck on a process.

Mapping Office Workflows Training

Course Outline
Course Objectives

Intended Audience

All employees in a non-manufacturing environment.

Time To Complete

2 hours (0.2 CEUs)

Why Map Office Workflows?

Workflows are patterns of tasks or steps in a process that are designed to lead to an output. The intent of mapping a workflow is to improve a process by uncovering “the good, the bad and the ugly” parts of the process. “Good” steps in a process are value-adding activities. Anything that does not add value is “bad.” Process steps that lead to errors, mistakes and defects represent the “ugly.” With the bad and ugly parts of a process uncovered, it is much easier to identify opportunities for improvement. In a manufacturing environment it is fairly easy to see the physical steps in the process; in an office/service environment steps in the process can be more difficult to see because they include non-tangible items such as information, services or transactions.

Mapping Office Workflows Online Training

Mapping Office Workflows helps office workers create visual representations of processes that they work in and provides them with tools that help unveil different aspects of their workflow and see the processes they work in from different angles. By using one or more of the mapping tools covered (Brown-Paper Flow, Workflow Diagrams, Flowcharting, Value-Stream Mapping), learners will be able to identify the causes of nagging problems and take action to remedy them.

This Training Enables Learners To…

  • Define the bounds of a workflow.
  • Use a variety of process (workflow) mapping techniques.
  • Identity hand-offs, disconnects, incomplete communication and rework loops as non-value-adding components (or waste).
  • Plan improvements to workflows.
  • Consider a move from batch processing to continuous (or one-piece) flow.

Recommended Prerequisites

  • None.

You May Also Be Interested In…

  • The 5S’s: Workplace Organization – Comprehensive training in the concepts and application of the 5S’s (Sort, Set in Order, Shine, Standardize and Sustain) and how to apply these techniques on the job.
  • Lean for Business Processes – Online training that provides learners with a comprehensive understanding of how Lean Manufacturing works in a transaction-based/non-manufacturing business or job function.
  • Value Stream Mapping – Focused training in how to map a value stream from developing a current state map, analyzing the value stream and then creating a future state map.

This Course is Derived from Lean for Business Processes

This course is a great way to learn how to map workflows.  It is taken from our comprehensive Lean for Business Processes course.  If you have already taken the Lean for Business Processes course, you have already seen the content covered in Mapping Office Workflows.

Mapping Office Workflows Course Outline

Lesson 1 | Overview of Workflows

  • Overview on what a workflow map is and how they can help improve processes.
  • Discussion on the types of maps and the value of each in the mapping process.

Lesson 2 | Brown Paper Workflows

  • Introduction to the Brown-Paper Flow as the place to start with mapping processes.
  • Step-by-step instructions on how to construct a brown-paper flow and how to use it to identify problems with a work process.

Lesson 3 | Workflow Diagrams

  • How to construct a workflow diagram to understand the physical flow of a process.
  • Using a workflow diagram to combine or eliminate steps, move sequential steps closer together, reduce the number of hand-offs and to convert to a continuous process.

Lesson 4 | Flowcharting

  • How to use flowcharts to document the details of a process including activities, decision points, wait periods, feedback loops and rework loops.
  • Four of the most common families of flowcharts are explored along with the pros and cons of each.

Lesson 5 | Value Stream Mapping

  • How to use a value-stream map to evaluate workflows and identify waste in a process.
  • Developing both a current state and future state map.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner’s progress in this course.

Mapping Office Workflows Course Objectives

  • Define the bounds of a workflow.
  • Use a variety of process (workflow) mapping techniques.
  • Identity hand-offs, disconnects, incomplete communication and rework loops as non-value-adding components (or waste.)
  • Plan improvements to workflows.
  • Consider a move from batch processing to continuous (or one-piece) flow.

Introduction to Lean Six Sigma Training

Introduction to Lean Six Sigma Training

Course Outline
Course Objectives

Intended Audience

All employees.

Time To Complete

1.5 hours (0.2 CEUs)

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Introduction to Lean Six Sigma Training Online

This training introduces learners to the fundamentals of Lean and Six Sigma and presents them as complementary, additive methodologies that focus on both waste and variation reduction. Organizations often use Introduction to Lean Six Sigma Training as their White Belt training because it provides a good overview of the philosophy of Lean Six Sigma and introduces key terminology and methodologies used in Lean Six Sigma organizations. Value stream mapping, elimination of waste, the 5S’s and the DMAIC project cycle are presented conceptually and cornerstone tools of Lean Six Sigma.

This course includes examples of how Lean Six Sigma can be effectively applied in manufacturing, the office, order entry, warehousing and distribution, sales and R&D. Participants also gain an appreciation of the bigger picture of Lean Six Sigma and the supporting infrastructure necessary for a successful Lean Six Sigma effort including the leadership team, champions, black and green belts, project teams, subject matter experts and DMAIC project management. Introduction to Lean Six Sigma Training is a great way to kick off a lean six sigma process or to introduce new employees to concepts that are already in place in the organization.

What is Lean Six Sigma?

Lean Six Sigma represents a business philosophy leading to the elimination of waste and the reduction of variation. With Lean Six Sigma, costs are reduced, productivity is raised and customer satisfaction is enhanced. The effort starts with understanding “value” through the eyes of the customer. Anything that does not add value is waste. Any variation from the target or ideal state is a potential source of added cost. Lean Six Sigma efforts tackle both waste and variation with a focus on customers and their needs. Lean and Six Sigma are part of a continuum in which efficiency (Six Sigma) is coupled with effectiveness (Lean) to create a robust improvement environment.

This Training Enables Learners To…

  • Understand the scope and breadth of a Lean Six Sigma initiative.
  • Gain an understanding of what waste is and how to identify it so that it can be reduced.
  • Become aware of variation and techniques to reduce it.
  • Become familiar with the DMAIC team project model.
  • Be aware of the infrastructure needed to support a Lean Six Sigma effort.

Features of All Courses

Recommended Prerequisites

  • None.

You May Also Be Interested In…

  • The 5S’s: Workplace Organization – Comprehensive training in the concepts and application of the 5S’s (Sort, Set in Order, Shine, Standardize and Sustain) and how to apply these techniques on the job.
  • Lean Manufacturing – Online training that provides learners with a comprehensive understanding of how Lean Manufacturing works in a manufacturing environment.
  • Lean for Business Processes – Online training that provides learners with a comprehensive understanding of how Lean Manufacturing works in a transaction-based/non-manufacturing business or job function.

Pricing Info

Introduction to Lean Six Sigma Course Outline

Lesson 1 | What is Lean Six Sigma

  • Lean Six Sigma Philosophy
  • Lean Six Sigma Methodologies

Lesson 2 | Improvement Methodologies

  • Value Stream Mapping
  • Elimination of Waste
  • The 5S’s
  • The DMAIC Project Cycle

Lesson 3 | Supporting Infrastructure

  • Components in the Supporting Infrastructure:
  • Leadership team
  • Champions
  • Black Belts
  • Green Belts
  • Project Teams
  • Subject Matter Experts
  • DMAIC Project Management

Lesson 4 | Application and Outcomes

  • Lean Six Sigma in:
    • Manufacturing
    • The “Office”
    • Order Entry
    • Warehousing and Distribution
    • Sales
    • R and D

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner’s progress in this course.

Introduction to Lean Six Sigma Course Objectives

  • Understand the scope and breadth of a Lean Six Sigma initiative.
  • Gain an understanding of what waste is and how to identify it so that it can be reduced.
  • Become aware of variation and techniques to reduce it.
  • Become familiar with the DMAIC and 8D team project models.
  • Be aware of the infrastructure needed to support a Lean Six Sigma effort.

Features of All QualityTrainingPortal Courses

Easy reporting for ISO 9001 and IATF 16949 records.

Powerful learning management and administration.

Media-rich presentation enhances the training.

Exercises reinforce concepts and keep learners engaged.

Printable PDF Reference Guide for future use.

Solid technical content developed by experts.

Learners progress through the training at their own pace.

Bookmarking so learners can start and stop the training as time allows.

Certificate of Completion that can be easily printed or saved.

CEUs awarded to fulfill continuing education requirements.

Lean for Business Processes Training

Course Outline
Course Objectives

Intended Audience

Front line employees, managers and supervisors in non-manufacturing environments.

Time To Complete

6 hours (0.6 CEUs)

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How can Lean Concepts Apply in Non-Manufacturing?

Lean manufacturing has been used both conceptually and in practice to identify and eliminate waste in manufacturing operations for years. Can Lean Manufacturing principles and practices be applied to business processes? Of course! Lean is all about getting waste out of processes and waste isn’t just something that happens in manufacturing. Non-manufacturing processes have hand-offs, disconnects, incomplete communications and rework loops.  Office and support processes are often ripe for streamlining and many of the same improvement tools such as process mapping, the 5S’s, and error-proofing can be used to achieve significant efficiencies.  Lean process measures can then be put into place to monitor the improvement results, hold the gains and identify new opportunities for improvement.

Lean Business Processes Online Training

Lean for Business Processes online training is designed specifically for those working in business processes and transactional environments. The course begins with explanations and examples of the Seven Wastes in “office-friendly” terms. Process mapping techniques are coupled with process streamlining methods to demonstrate how value streams can be configured to be more effective. The course adds 5S, error-proofing and TPM techniques to the Lean Business Process arsenal and wraps up with descriptions of measures that can be used to sustain and expand the Lean initiative.  We also have a Lean Manufacturing course for manufacturing environments.

This Training Enables Learners To…

  • Understand the Seven Wastes and be able to actively support efforts to reduce them.
  • Recognize value-added from the customer’s perspective.
  • Use Brown-Paper Flowcharts, Workflow Diagrams and Value Stream Maps to document current processes.
  • “Question” workflows to identify non-value-adding activities and tasks.
  • Develop a plan to simplify and streamline workflows.
  • Support a 5S effort in their work area.
  • Understand the power of error-proofing to prevent future problems.
  • Assist a Business Process TPM effort.
  • Be able to track macro measures of the Lean initiative.

Recommended Prerequisites

You May Also Be Interested In…

  • The 5S’s: Workplace Organization – Comprehensive training in the concepts and application of the 5S’s (Sort, Set in Order, Shine, Standardize and Sustain) and how to apply these techniques on the job.
  • 8D Problem-Solving – Step-by-step training in how to work on a problem-solving team follow the 8D methodology including tools and techniques that are used in each step.

Lean Business Processes Course Outline

Lesson 1 | Tackling Waste

  • Identify the seven wastes.
  • Explain value-adding versus non-value adding.
  • Define value from customer’s perspectives.
  • Briefly describe how each of the seven wastes detracts value from a process.

Lesson 2 | Process Mapping

  • Define the bounds of a workflow.
  • Use a variety of process (workflow) mapping techniques.
  • Identity hand-offs, disconnects, incomplete communication and rework loops as non-value-adding components (or waste.)
  • Plan improvements to workflows.
  • Consider a move from batch processing to continuous (or one-piece) flow.

Lesson 3 | Streamline the Process

  • Know what Takt Time means.
  • Identify process bottlenecks.
  • Calculate Process Cycle Efficiency.
  • Understand how to balance workloads within a process workflow.
  • Calculate First Pass Yield.
  • Be familiar with workflow and work station layout considerations.

Lesson 4 | 5S’s in the Office

  • Identify each of the 5S’s.
  • Know how to clear clutter from a work area.
  • Explain the rationale for selecting effective designated storage locations.
  • Understand how to maintain the work area’s appearance and use preventive measures to keep it clean.
  • Describe what it means to standardize and why standardization is important.
  • Know how to use audits to sustain workplace organization and to prevent backsliding.

Lesson 5 | Error-Proofing Overview

  • Understand the error-proofing mindset.
  • Be aware of common error-proofing techniques.
  • Comprehend the Transaction Model (consisting of the server-side and customer-side.)
  • Know how to use basic root cause analysis tools.

Lesson 6 | TPM for Business Processes

  • Be aware of TPM’s impact on the Seven Wastes.
  • Recognize TPM’s influence on reliability and uptime of business process support systems.
  • Begin measuring Overall Equipment Effectiveness.

Lesson 7 | Lean Business Process Measures

  • Measure Lean efforts by tracking Process Cycle Efficiency trends.
  • Create a Balanced Scorecard to track waste reduction.
  • Audit 5S activities to maintain workplace organization momentum.
  • Monitor uptime, throughput rates and yields using Overall Equipment Effectiveness.
  • Develop two-dimensional surveys to gather meaningful customer feedback.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner’s progress in this course.

Lean Business Processes Course Objectives

  • Understand the Seven Wastes and be able to actively support efforts to reduce them.
  • Recognize value-added from the customer’s perspective.
  • Use Brown-Paper Flowcharts, Workflow Diagrams and Value Stream Maps to document current processes.
  • “Question” workflows to identify non-value-adding activities and tasks.
  • Develop a plan to simplify and streamline workflows.
  • Support a 5S effort in their work area.
  • Understand the power of error-proofing to prevent future problems.
  • Assist a Business Process TPM effort.
  • Be able to track macro measures of the Lean initiative.

Lean Manufacturing for Job Shops Training

Course Outline
Course Objectives

Intended Audience

Operators, engineers, quality professionals, managers and supervisors in job shop environments.

Time To Complete

7 hours (0.7 CEUs)

How can Lean Concepts Apply in Job Shops?

For years, Lean practices have helped manufacturing operations reduce waste and improve operational effectiveness. Unfortunately, some Lean tools and techniques do not translate well to Job Shop operations. Since Job Shops deal with an unpredictable and diverse product mix of short runs, some cornerstone Lean tools are not practical. Value Stream Mapping does not yield the same insight for a high-mix, low-volume operation as it does for a low-mix, high-volume process. Likewise, takt time, line balancing and even full adoption of flow cells are not as important in a Job Shop environment as they are in high-volume operations.

Does this mean that Lean Manufacturing has no place in a Job Shop? Absolutely not! Many conventional Lean practices can be adapted for use in a Job Shop and can produce the same level of waste reduction and value-added gains as can be generated in high-volume, low-mix processes.

Lean for Job Shops Online Training

Lean for Job Shops online training is designed specifically to help Job Shops adapt, prioritize and apply Lean Manufacturing tools and techniques to a Job Shop environment. Participants will learn how to implement Lean Manufacturing practices to complement the realities of their unique job shop environment.

The Lean for Job Shops online training has two units. Unit 1, Adapting Lean to Job Shops, starts by exploring the “Realities of Job Shops,” the related consequences to the operation and outlines a three-phased approach to address the “realities.” In Unit 2, Lean Job Shop Practices, five significant action plans for a Lean Job Shop environment are presented as a series of interdependent activities. These, coupled with trend analysis measures, will lead to success in making Job Shops lean and (more) productive.

This Training Enables Learners To…

  • Understand why traditional Lean techniques are often a challenge to apply in a Job Shop environment.
  • Define the major components of Lean and identify which are best suited for a Job Shop and how they can be adapted to work successfully.
  • Develop a plan for Lean implementation.
  • Track and measure the results of Lean manufacturing efforts.

Recommended Prerequisites

You May Also Be Interested In…

  • The 5S’s: Workplace Organization – Comprehensive training in the concepts and application of the 5S’s (Sort, Set in Order, Shine, Standardize and Sustain) and how to apply these techniques on the job.
  • Mistake-Proofing Training – Comprehensive online training in poka yoke/mistake-proofing techniques for manufacturing operations.
  • Gage Training – Comprehensive training in how to use a variety precision hand gages including an overview of basic measuring concepts, introductory blueprint reading, an overview of GD&T, and which gages to use when.

Lean Manufacturing for Job Shops Course Outline

Unit 1 Adapting Lean to Job Shops

Lesson 1 | Does Lean Really Apply?

  • Appreciate the Realities that Job Shops must contend with.
  • Be aware of the consequences of those Realities.
  • Realize that Lean approaches can be modified and adapted to deal with Job Shop Realities.

Lesson 2 | Lean Job Shop Terminology

  • Define key Lean manufacturing terms.
  • Describe vital Lean tools.
  • Be familiar with additive Lean techniques.

Lesson 3 | Wastes in Job Shop Terms

  • Identify the seven wastes.
  • Explain value-adding versus non-value adding.
  • Define value from the customer’s perspective.
  • Briefly describe how each of the seven wastes detracts from the value of a process’ output.

Lesson 4 | Linking Realities to Wastes

  • Associate Job Shop Realities with the Seven Wastes.
  • Uncover patterns of how the effects of Job Shop Realities lead to Waste.
  • Discover common themes of the effects and the corresponding impact on Waste.
  • Recognize potential root causes of the common themes.

Lesson 5 | Preview of the Means

  • Understand that Lean practices can be adapted to a Job Shop environment by developing a compelling Message, building Momentum and making structural changes (the Means.)
  • Become aware that the Means can be a combination of the 5S’s, Set-up Reduction, Workflow/Layout adjustments, TPM and Visual Workplace practices.

Unit 1 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner’s progress in this unit.

Unit 2 Lean Job Shop Practices

Lesson 1 | Message, Momentum and Means

  • Become familiar with how a three-phased approach (Message, Momentum and Means) can be used to adapt Lean practices to a Job Shop environment.
  • Understand how the “Means” represent a series of interdependent action plans creating a robust approach to Lean.

Lesson 2 | Embrace the 5S’s

  • Identify what each of the 5S’s stands for and how it helps an organization reduce waste.
  • Understand the tactics/techniques to “sort” by determining what belongs and what does not belong in a work area.
  • Explain the rationale for effective storage locations.
  • Describe what it means to standardize and why standardization is important.
  • Identify strategies to sustain workplace organization and to prevent backsliding.

Lesson 3 | Reduce Set-Up Time

  • Describe the purpose and benefits of reducing set-up time.
  • Explain the difference between internal and external set-up time.
  • Identify the key components of set-up reduction and explain the role each plays in reducing set-up time.

Lesson 4 | Adjust Workflows and Layouts

  • Explain the linkage between layouts and workflows.
  • Describe why identification of Product Families is an important step for improving layouts and subsequent workflows.
  • Understand types of data needed to design effective layouts and workflows.
  • Identify major issues for selecting layout and corresponding Macro-Workflow from various options.
  • Understand factors to be considered to refine Micro-Workflows.

Lesson 5 | TPM Basics

  • Explain how TPM aids Lean efforts and addresses wastes.
  • Know the difference between Corrective Maintenance , Preventive Maintenance (PM) and Predictive Maintenance (PdM).
  • Understand how the three sequential Phases of TPM build on each other.
  • Realize how PdM techniques can further traditional PM practices.

Lesson 6 | The Visual Workplace

  • Describe what is meant by the Visual Workplace.
  • Understand the meaning of Visual Controls, Prompts and Displays.
  • Appreciate how powerful visual aids, supports and alerts can be to make it easer to do things the right way and reduce waste.

Lesson 7 | Track and Improve

  • Understand why it is important to measure the progress of action plans.
  • Be familiar with potential measures for Lean Job Shop action plans.

Unit 2 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner’s progress in this unit.

Lean Manufacturing for Job Shops Course Objectives

Unit 1 | Adapting Lean to Job Shops

  • Realize that Lean approaches can be modified and adapted to deal with Job Shop Realities.
  • Define key Lean manufacturing terms.
  • Describe vital Lean tools.
  • Be familiar with additive Lean techniques.
  • Identify the Seven Wastes and briefly describe how each of the Seven Wastes detracts from the value of a process’ output
  • Uncover patterns of how the effects of Job Shop Realities lead to Waste.
  • Understand that Lean practices can be adapted to a Job Shop environment by developing a compelling Message, building Momentum and making structural changes (the Means.)
  • Become aware that the Means can be a combination of the 5S’s, Set-up Reduction, Workflow/Layout adjustments, TPM and Visual Workplace practices.

Unit 2 | Lean Job Shop Practices

  • Become familiar with how a three-phased approach (Message, Momentum and Means) can be used to adapt Lean practices and understand how the “Means” represent a series of interdependent action plans.
  • Identify what each of the 5S’s stands for and how it helps an organization reduce waste.
  • Identify the key components of set-up reduction and explain the role each plays in reducing set-up time.
  • Understand the linkage between layouts and workflows and know how to adjust layouts to make workflows more effective.
  • Know the difference between Corrective Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance (PM) and Predictive Maintenance (PdM) and how to incorporate appropriate maintenance practices to improve equipment reliability.
  • Appreciate how powerful visual aids, supports and alerts can be incorporated to make it easier to do things the right way and reduce waste.
  • Be able to use measures to track and evaluate Lean Job Shop action plans.

Visual Workplace Basics Training

Course Outline
Course Objectives

Intended Audience

All employees.

Time To Complete

1.5 hours (0.2 CEUs)

What is the Visual Workplace?

When an organization commits to create a Visual Workplace, they are committing to exploring ways that make it easier for people to get their work done effectively and efficiently. Most Visual Workplace techniques involve the use of relatively “low-tech” common-sense modifications to work practices. The techniques either make jobs easier to do, highlight potential problems that may be emerging before they become serious or help identify something that has gone wrong – all through the use of visual controls, visual displays or visual prompts.

Visual Workplace techniques become indispensable “aids” when they become woven into the very fabric of the job. Visual Workplace practices can help transform procedures and processes by becoming always-available self-help (visual) cues that simplify tasks while making them more repeatable and reliable.

Visual Workplace Basics Online Training

Visual Workplace Basics introduces learners to the concept of visual controls, prompts and displays as tools that can make work easier and reduce errors.

This Training Enables Learners To…

  • Describe what is meant by the Visual Workplace.
  • List the underlying tenets of Visual Workplace.
  • Understand the meaning of Visual Controls, Prompts and Displays.
  • Identify candidates for the use of Visual Workplace techniques.
  • Explain how visual aids, supports and alerts can make it easier to do things the right way and reduce waste.
  • List specific examples of Visual Controls, Visual Prompts and Visual Displays.

Recommended Prerequisites

  • None.

You May Also Be Interested In…

  • 5S’s Workplace Organization – Comprehensive training in the concepts and application of the 5S’s (Sort, Set in Order, Shine, Standardize and Sustain) and how to apply these techniques on the job.
  • Lean Manufacturing – Online training that provides learners with a comprehensive understanding of how Lean Manufacturing works in a manufacturing environment.
  • Mistake-Proofing Training – Comprehensive online training in poka yoke/mistake-proofing techniques for manufacturing operations.

This Course is Derived from Lean for Job Shops

This course is a great way to learn about visual workplace concepts.  It is taken from our comprehensive Lean for Job Shops course.  If you have already taken the Lean for Job Shops course, you have already seen the content covered in Visual Workplace Basics.

Visual Workplace Basics Course Outline

Lesson 1 | What is the Visual Workplace

  • Describe what is meant by the Visual Workplace.
  • List the underlying tenets of Visual Workplace.
  • Understand the meaning of Visual Controls, Prompts and Displays.

Lesson 2 | Visual Workplace Techniques

  • Identify candidates for the use of Visual Workplace techniques.
  • Explain how visual aids, supports and alerts can make it easier to do things the right way and reduce waste.
  • List specific examples of Visual Controls, Visual Prompts and Visual Displays.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner’s progress in this course.

Visual Workplace Basics Course Objectives

  • Describe what is meant by the Visual Workplace.
  • List the underlying tenets of Visual Workplace.
  • Understand the meaning of Visual Controls, Prompts and Displays.
  • Identify candidates for the use of Visual Workplace techniques.
  • Explain how visual aids, supports and alerts can make it easier to do things the right way and reduce waste.
  • List specific examples of Visual Controls, Visual Prompts and Visual Displays.

Lean Manufacturing Training

Course Outline
Course Objectives

Intended Audience

All level of employees in a manufacturing environment.

Time To Complete

15 hours (1.5 CEUs)

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What is Lean Manufacturing?

Simply put, lean organizations are customer-focused. They reduce waste in their value streams by improving workflows and then by subsequently improving the physical layout of their facilities. Process capacity is managed and actually increased by reducing set-up times, improving quality, and ensuring equipment works when it is counted upon to work.

Successful implementation of a lean initiative will improve an organization’s marketplace and financial performance. However, many aspects of lean are counter-intuitive to traditional manufacturing thinking and practices. It is vital that organizations adopting a lean approach understand the scope, the many elements, and the potential pitfalls of lean.

Lean Manufacturing Training Online

Lean Manufacturing Training provides learners with a comprehensive understanding of how Lean Manufacturing works in a manufacturing company. Lean concepts (why lean, lean terminology, identifying wastes, Value Stream Mapping methods and the linkage between lean and Six Sigma) and lean practices (streamlining the value stream, workplace organization, ensuring predictability and consistency, set-up reduction, TPM, the visual workplace and continuous improvement) are covered. Lean Manufacturing Training provides the learner with lean implementation suggestions including approaches for addressing people issues, collecting and analyzing data to plan and track lean efforts, process workflow and layouts options with rationale and a sequential roadmap.
See a sample lesson from the Lean Manufacturing Training online course.

This Training Enables Learners To…

  • Understand the terms, terminology, and benefits of Lean Manufacturing.
  • Conduct value stream maps of the current state, identify the potentials for reduced waste and improved flow, and develop a future state map.
  • Participate in the development of a site-specific lean implementation roadmap.
  • Avoid the common pitfalls encountered during lean implementation.

Recommended Prerequisites

You May Also Be Interested In…

  • The 5S’s: Workplace Organization – Comprehensive training in the concepts and application of the 5S’s (Sort, Set in Order, Shine, Standardize and Sustain) and how to apply these techniques on the job.
  • Lean for Job Shops – Online training in how to apply lean manufacturing techniques in short-run, job shop environments.
  • Mistake-Proofing Training – Comprehensive online training in poka yoke/mistake-proofing techniques for manufacturing operations.

Lean Manufacturing Course Outline

Unit 1 Lean Concepts

Lesson 1 | Why Lean?

  • Be customer focused: Be on-time, responsive, flexible, and fast.
  • Simplify and standardize workflows: Mimic continuous flow, minimize WIP, use visible measures.
  • Manage capacity: Increase process uptime, reduce set-up times, find “lost” capacity.
  • Eliminate waste: Identify non-value adding activities, then modify, combine, or eliminate those tasks.
  • JiT: Not too early and never late; not just-in-case inventory but just-in-time production and delivery; products must always be made right the first time; equipment must always work when needed.

Lesson 2 | Lean Terminology

  • Terms
  • Tools
  • Techniques

Lesson 3 | Eliminate Waste

  • Match lot sizes to customer demands: Use kanbans; end WIP.
  • Use pull scheduling instead of push scheduling.
  • Schedule to the rate-determining step (the bottleneck), then de-bottleneck process lines.
  • Facilitate fast feedback: Arrange sequential operations next to each other to ensure fast feedback from internal customer operations to internal supplier operations if something in-process is not right.

Lesson 4 | Components of Lean

  • Overview of the 8 Components of Lean: Value Stream Mapping, Workplace Organization, Predictability and Consistency, Set-up Reduction, TPM, Visual Factory, Support Processes, and Continuous Improvement.

Lesson 5 | Value Stream Analysis

  • Map the process from incoming order to outgoing product: Define process goals, create the current state map, and establish process metrics.
  • Use the current state map to identify potential improvements, conceive the future state.

Lesson 6 | The Lean Mindset

  • Eliminating waste is not limited to manufacturing; the same techniques apply to the office, sales, finance, maintenance, and even RandD processes and procedures.
  • Lean and Six Sigma are complementary.

Unit 1 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner’s progress in this unit.

Unit 2 Lean Practices

Lesson 1 | Streamlining the Value Stream

  • Identify process goals.
  • Collect and analyze process data.
  • Create a macro-facility workflow to determine how to minimize high volume travel distances.
  • Conduct a micro-process workflow to apply cellular concepts, identify and remove bottlenecks, and move to pull manufacturing with kanbans.

Lesson 2 | Workplace Organization

  • Apply the 5Ss: Sort (clearing the work area), Set in Order (designating locations), Shine (cleanliness and workplace appearance), Standardize (everyone doing things the same way), and Sustain (ingraining it in the culture).

Lesson 3 | Predictability and Consistency

  • Use DFA/DFM to design quality in.
  • Conduct GRandRs to ensure reliable measurement systems are in place.
  • Employ SPC to help ensure processes are predictable and stable.
  • Reduce variation and improve process capability with DOE.
  • Eliminate the root cause of defects using problem-solving and mistake-proofing.
  • Move to Six Sigma quality.

Lesson 4 | Set-Up Reduction

  • Apply SMED concepts.
  • Separate external tasks (external to the process) from internal tasks.

Lesson 5 | TPM

  • TPM versus PM
  • Develop operator involvement in the equipment and begin predictive maintenance practices.

Lesson 6 | Visual Workplace

  • Visual Workplace
  • Use status display of performance for dashboard or balanced measures and COQ results.
  • Visual controls, such as sensory alerts, indicate if something is out of place.
  • Marking on the floor, kanbans, andons, and panel-alarms all help build a visual control infrastructure.

Lesson 7 | Support Processes

  • Lean techniques require changes in Purchasing, Scheduling, Warehousing/Shipping, and Accounting practices.

Lesson 8 | Continuous Improvement

  • Fight NIH (not-invented-here) attitudes and leverage successes.
  • Use kaizen events for rapid, targeted improvements to achieve the future state.
  • Use a standardized Problem-Solving Model (e.g. DMAIC or 8D).
  • Begin an employee idea system.

Unit 2 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner’s progress in this unit.

Unit 3 Implementing Lean

Lesson 1 | Lean Starts with People

  • Lean Starts with People
  • Communicate the why, what, how, and who.
  • Provide education in the concepts.
  • Train employees in tools and techniques as needed to achieve a flexible workforce.

Lesson 2 | Data Drives Lean

  • Focus efforts on projects that lead to tangible savings.
  • Calculation techniques to generate data include: Time studies, equipment loading, TAKT time, staffing requirements, process yields, and COQ.
  • Sample Worksheets covered include: Lean Project Summary; Cell Target Worksheet; Data Collection Form for Basic Equipment and Utility Parameters; Value-Adding Analysis Worksheet; Process Change-Over/Setup Worksheet; Set-Up Reduction Worksheet; and Lot Size Worksheet.

Lesson 3 | Layout Options

  • Improved layouts are about moving cubic feet (not numbers of items), eliminating crossover points, arranging the process in the natural flow order; linking processes to minimize time and distance; moving equipment together to simulate a continuous process flow; and putting internal customers and suppliers next to each other.
  • Be careful to identify anchors or monuments; do not move them.
  • Typical layout options are explored.

Lesson 4 | Lean Inventory Practices

  • Minimize trips to and from the warehouse by designing the warehouse to work for you.
  • Use ABC inventory categories to prioritize inventory needs and storage locations.

Lesson 5 | Roadmap for Lean

  • Start with the people issues.
  • Focus on workplace organization (the 5S’s), then, use value stream analysis and process workflow analysis to establish effective layouts.
  • Where to focus next depends on specific needs.
  • Use targeted Kaizen events to speed changes.
  • Do not overlook the need to modify support processes (especially scheduling and purchasing).

Lesson 6 | Lean Pitfalls

  • Not documenting the financial impact/savings.
  • Lack of commitment from leadership.
  • Using traditional purchasing practices.
  • Not changing scheduling techniques.
  • Failure to address workforce issues.
  • Not mistake-proofing the root cause.
  • Thinking Lean is just for manufacturing.
  • Not using beneficial technology.
  • Not leveraging successes.
  • Getting too lean.
  • Failure to hold the gains.

Unit 3 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner’s progress in this unit.

Lean Manufacturing Course Objectives

Unit 1 | Lean Concepts

  • Understand the reasons for implementing lean.
  • Learn the terms, tools, and techniques used in lean.
  • Identify the types of waste that can be eliminated with lean.
  • Describe the components and elements of a lean effort.
  • Explain value stream mapping, techniques for analyzing the current state map and for envisioning the future state of the workflow.
  • Describe why and how lean can apply to finance, maintenance, sales and R&D processes.
  • Compare and contract the linkages and differences between lean and six sigma initiatives.

Unit 2 | Lean Practices

  • Streamlining the Value Stream: Learn how to use value stream maps to create macro-facility workflows and micro-process workflows.
  • Workplace Organization: Understand how the 5S’s establish a structured approach for storing materials, supplies, and equipment in work areas.
  • Predictability & Consistency: Discover how quality improvement techniques such as GR&Rs, SPC, DOE, DFA/DFM, and (especially) mistake-proofing help prevent problems and lead to robust processes.
  • Set-Up Reduction: Investigate how to slash set-up and change-over times and understand how important fast set-ups are to lean efforts.
  • TPM: Learn how to improve equipment reliability by applying TPM methods.
  • Visual Workplace: See how visual controls and visual displays reinforce and enhances a lean effort.
  • Support Processes: Recognize how important lean scheduling, lean purchasing, lean accounting, and lean warehousing practices are to supporting and sustaining a lean manufacturing effort.
  • Continuous Improvement: Explore the options for keeping a lean effort viable and vital.

Unit 3 | Implementing Lean

  • Understand how important it is to address people issues as cross-training and flexible staffing practices are introduced.
  • Review the types and forms of data needed to support lean implementation.
  • Explore forms used to help plan and track lean efforts.
  • Investigate layout options and methods to determine the best option for your workflow and facility.
  • Learn how a lean warehouse complements lean manufacturing.
  • Review a systematic roadmap for introducing and implementing lean.
  • Explore 12 common lean pitfalls and learn how to avoid them.

Overview of Lean Training

Course Outline
Course Objectives

Intended Audience

All level of employees in a manufacturing environment.

Time To Complete

1.5 hours (0.2 CEUs)

What is Lean Manufacturing?

Simply put, lean organizations are customer-focused. They reduce waste in their value streams by improving workflows and then by subsequently improving the physical layout of their facilities. Process capacity is managed and actually increased by reducing set-up times, improving quality, and ensuring equipment works when it is counted upon to work.

Successful implementation of a lean initiative will improve an organization’s marketplace and financial performance. However, many aspects of lean are counter-intuitive to traditional manufacturing thinking and practices. It is vital that organizations adopting a lean approach understand the scope, the many elements, and the potential pitfalls of lean.

Overview of Lean Online Training

This course provides an overview of the principles and practices of Lean.  It is a great starting point for organizations to introduce managers and employees to the concepts and benefits of Lean Manufacturing.

This Training Enables Learners To…

  • Describe the key concepts of lean manufacturing.
  • Name and describe the seven wastes.
  • List the eight components of lean and define each.

Recommended Prerequisites

  • None.

You May Also Be Interested In…

  • Lean Manufacturing – Online training that provides learners with a comprehensive understanding of how Lean Manufacturing works in a manufacturing environment.
  • Lean for Business Processes – Online training that provides learners with a comprehensive understanding of how Lean Manufacturing works in a transaction-based/non-manufacturing business or job function.
  • Lean for Job Shops – Online training in how to apply lean manufacturing techniques in short-run, job shop environments.

Overview of Lean Course Outline

Lesson 1 | Why Lean?

  • Be customer focused: Be on-time, responsive, flexible, and fast.
  • Simplify and standardize workflows: Mimic continuous flow, minimize WIP, use visible measures.
  • Manage capacity: Increase process uptime, reduce set-up times, find “lost” capacity.
  • Eliminate waste: Identify non-value adding activities, then modify, combine, or eliminate those tasks.
  • JiT: Not too early and never late; not just-in-case inventory but just-in-time production and delivery; products must always be made right the first time; equipment must always work when needed.

Lesson 2 | Eliminate Waste

  • Elimination of waste starts with identification of waste. Anything that does not add value is classified as waste.
  • Waste can be classified into seven categories: Waiting, Transportation, Processing, Motion, Quality, Inventory and Overproduction.

Lesson 3 | Components of Lean

  • Overview of the 8 Components of Lean: Value Stream Mapping, Workplace Organization, Predictability and Consistency, Set-up Reduction, TPM, Visual Factory, Support Processes, and Continuous Improvement.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner’s progress in this course.

Overview of Lean Course Objectives

  • Describe the key concepts of lean manufacturing.
  • Name and describe the seven wastes.
  • Briefly describe how each of the seven wastes add costs to a process.
  • Define value-adding and non-value adding.
  • List the eight components of lean and define each.

Lean Mindset Training

Course Outline
Course Objectives

Intended Audience

All level of employees in a manufacturing environment.

Time To Complete

1.5 hours (0.2 CEUs)

What is A Lean Manufacturing Mindset?

Simply put, lean organizations are customer-focused. They reduce waste in their value streams by improving workflows and then by subsequently improving the physical layout of their facilities. Process capacity is managed and actually increased by reducing set-up times, improving quality, and ensuring equipment works when it is counted upon to work.

Successful implementation of a lean initiative requires a mindset that focuses on the customer and sees waste as a cost not to be tolerated by the organization.  While this makes sense many aspects of lean are counter-intuitive to traditional manufacturing thinking and practices.

The Lean Mindset Online Training

This course explores the mindset needed to launch and sustain a successful Lean initiative.  The most productive lean efforts extend beyond manufacturing to the entire organization; it is everyone’s job to drive waste out of the organization.  The Lean Mindset Online Training describes how different functions in a business can apply Lean Manufacturing techniques to streamline the value stream.  Learners will also be introduced to lean terminology so the organization has a common lean language.

This Training Enables Learners To…

  • See the benefit of streamlining the value stream in all functions of a business.
  • Understand how lean techniques can be applied to the office, sales, finance, maintenance and R&D functions.
  • Describe how Lean & Six Sigma are complementary.

Recommended Prerequisites

You May Also Be Interested In…

  • Lean Manufacturing – Online training that provides learners with a comprehensive understanding of how Lean Manufacturing works in a manufacturing environment.
  • Lean for Business Processes – Online training that provides learners with a comprehensive understanding of how Lean Manufacturing works in a transaction-based/non-manufacturing business or job function.

Lean Mindset Course Outline

Lesson 1 | Why Lean?

  • Be customer focused: Be on-time, responsive, flexible, and fast.
  • Simplify and standardize workflows: Mimic continuous flow, minimize WIP, use visible measures.
  • Manage capacity: Increase process uptime, reduce set-up times, find “lost” capacity.
  • Eliminate waste: Identify non-value adding activities, then modify, combine, or eliminate those tasks.
  • JiT: Not too early and never late; not just-in-case inventory but just-in-time production and delivery; products must always be made right the first time; equipment must always work when needed.

Lesson 2 | Lean Terminology

  • Terms
  • Tools
  • Techniques

Lesson 3 | Streamlining the Value Stream

  • Identify process goals.
  • Collect and analyze process data.
  • Create a macro-facility workflow to determine how to minimize high volume travel distances.
  • Conduct a micro-process workflow to apply cellular concepts, identify and remove bottlenecks, and move to pull manufacturing with kanbans.

Lesson 4 | Continuous Improvement

  • Fight NIH (not-invented-here) attitudes and leverage successes.
  • Use kaizen events for rapid, targeted improvements to achieve the future state.
  • Use a standardized Problem-Solving Model (e.g. DMAIC or 8D).
  • Begin an employee idea system.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner’s progress in this course.

Lean Mindset Course Objectives

  • Explain why it is important that lean not just be used in manufacturing, but throughout the organization.
  • Describe the benefits of lean in the office, maintenance, R&D, and Sales.
  • Define key lean terms and know how to apply lean terminology.
  • Understand the purpose of streamlining the value stream.
  • Describe the steps to streamline a workflow.
  • Identify the key characteristics of a lean value stream.
  • Compare and contrast the difference between a macro and micro workflow.
  • Describe the impact of a bottleneck on a process.
  • Explain what “If it’s not broke, fix it anyway.” means.
  • Identify activities that can help you learn from others outside of your organization.
  • Describe the benefits of cross-training.

Lean Support Processes Training

Course Outline
Course Objectives

Intended Audience

All level of employees who work in departments that support manufacturing operations.

Time To Complete

2 hours (0.2 CEUs)

What Are Lean Support Processes?

Lean does not apply to just manufacturing processes. Lean involves eliminating waste in the entire organization. In fact, lean efforts in certain manufacturing support processes is critical to success in lean manufacturing implementation.  Lean Manufacturing practices cannot be effectively implemented without corresponding changes to purchasing, scheduling, accounting and shipping supporting functions.

Lean Support Processes Online Training

This course will help employees who support manufacturing operations understand how Lean Manufacturing will impact their functions and responsibilities.  Each key function  purchasing, scheduling, accounting and shipping/warehousing) is presented in terms of how its role needs to change to support lean manufacturing as well as how wastes need to be driven out of the supporting process itself.

This Training Enables Learners To…

  • Think of their function and how it will change to support lean manufacturing.
  • Understand how wastes in their processes impact the value stream and the end customer.

Recommended Prerequisites

  • Understanding of terminology and philosophy of Lean Manufacturing such as Overview of Lean or equivalent.

You May Also Be Interested In…

  • Lean Manufacturing – Online training that provides learners with a comprehensive understanding of how Lean Manufacturing works in a manufacturing environment.
  • Lean for Business Processes – Online training that provides learners with a comprehensive understanding of how Lean Manufacturing works in a transaction-based/non-manufacturing business or job function.

Lean Support Processes Course Outline

Lesson 1 | Support Processes

  • Lean techniques require changes in Purchasing, Scheduling, Warehousing/Shipping, and Accounting practices.

Lesson 2 | Lean Starts with People

  • Lean Starts with People
  • Communicate the why, what, how, and who.
  • Provide education in the concepts.
  • Train employees in tools and techniques as needed to achieve a flexible workforce.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner’s progress in this course.

Lean Support Processes Course Objectives

  • Describe the role that support departments play in Lean Manufacturing.
  • Define what “lower cost of ownership” means.
  • Explain how bottlenecks are handled when scheduling in a lean operation.
  • Explain why lean manufacturing requires skilled workers and effective leaders.
  • Describe what “cross-functional and interdependent departments” means.
  • Define customer-focused and flexible, adaptable, and resourceful and explain what they mean to a lean environment.

Value Stream Mapping Course Outline

Lesson 1 | Value Stream Analysis

  • Defining what the Value Stream is and why is should be mapped.
  • How to use process flow mapping symbols to show the flow of the process - both the current state and the desired future state.

Lesson 2 | Streamlining the Value Stream

  • Using the Value Stream Map to understand sources of waste and then to conduct a work analysis and then to create a macro workflow and finally a micro workflow.
  • Focus on the characteristics of a lean value stream and how to build those into the future state.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this course.

Value Stream Mapping Course Objectives

  • Describe the purpose of a Value Stream Map.
  • Identify the key components of a Value Stream Map.
  • Explain the key steps in developing the Future State Map.
  • Understand the purpose of streamlining the value stream.
  • Describe the steps to streamline a workflow.
  • Identify the key characteristics of a lean value stream.
  • Compare and contrast the difference between a macro and micro workflow.
  • Describe the impact of a bottleneck on a process.

Mapping Office Workflows Course Outline

Lesson 1 | Overview of Workflows

  • Overview on what a workflow map is and how they can help improve processes.
  • Discussion on the types of maps and the value of each in the mapping process.

Lesson 2 | Brown Paper Workflows

  • Introduction to the Brown-Paper Flow as the place to start with mapping processes.
  • Step-by-step instructions on how to construct a brown-paper flow and how to use it to identify problems with a work process.

Lesson 3 | Workflow Diagrams

  • How to construct a workflow diagram to understand the physical flow of a process.
  • Using a workflow diagram to combine or eliminate steps, move sequential steps closer together, reduce the number of hand-offs and to convert to a continuous process.

Lesson 4 | Flowcharting

  • How to use flowcharts to document the details of a process including activities, decision points, wait periods, feedback loops and rework loops.
  • Four of the most common families of flowcharts are explored along with the pros and cons of each.

Lesson 5 | Value Stream Mapping

  • How to use a value-stream map to evaluate workflows and identify waste in a process.
  • Developing both a current state and future state map.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this course.

Mapping Office Workflows Course Objectives

  • Define the bounds of a workflow.
  • Use a variety of process (workflow) mapping techniques.
  • Identity hand-offs, disconnects, incomplete communication and rework loops as non-value-adding components (or waste.)
  • Plan improvements to workflows.
  • Consider a move from batch processing to continuous (or one-piece) flow.

Introduction to Lean Six Sigma Course Outline

Lesson 1 | What is Lean Six Sigma

  • Lean Six Sigma Philosophy
  • Lean Six Sigma Methodologies

Lesson 2 | Improvement Methodologies

  • Value Stream Mapping
  • Elimination of Waste
  • The 5S's
  • The DMAIC Project Cycle

Lesson 3 | Supporting Infrastructure

  • Components in the Supporting Infrastructure:
  • Leadership team
  • Champions
  • Black Belts
  • Green Belts
  • Project Teams
  • Subject Matter Experts
  • DMAIC Project Management

Lesson 4 | Application and Outcomes

  • Lean Six Sigma in:
    • Manufacturing
    • The "Office"
    • Order Entry
    • Warehousing and Distribution
    • Sales
    • R and D

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this course.

Introduction to Lean Six Sigma Course Objectives

  • Understand the scope and breadth of a Lean Six Sigma initiative.
  • Gain an understanding of what waste is and how to identify it so that it can be reduced.
  • Become aware of variation and techniques to reduce it.
  • Become familiar with the DMAIC and 8D team project models.
  • Be aware of the infrastructure needed to support a Lean Six Sigma effort.

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Lean Business Processes Course Outline

Lesson 1 | Tackling Waste

  • Identify the seven wastes.
  • Explain value-adding versus non-value adding.
  • Define value from customer's perspectives.
  • Briefly describe how each of the seven wastes detracts value from a process.

Lesson 2 | Process Mapping

  • Define the bounds of a workflow.
  • Use a variety of process (workflow) mapping techniques.
  • Identity hand-offs, disconnects, incomplete communication and rework loops as non-value-adding components (or waste.)
  • Plan improvements to workflows.
  • Consider a move from batch processing to continuous (or one-piece) flow.

Lesson 3 | Streamline the Process

  • Know what Takt Time means.
  • Identify process bottlenecks.
  • Calculate Process Cycle Efficiency.
  • Understand how to balance workloads within a process workflow.
  • Calculate First Pass Yield.
  • Be familiar with workflow and work station layout considerations.

Lesson 4 | 5S's in the Office

  • Identify each of the 5S's.
  • Know how to clear clutter from a work area.
  • Explain the rationale for selecting effective designated storage locations.
  • Understand how to maintain the work area's appearance and use preventive measures to keep it clean.
  • Describe what it means to standardize and why standardization is important.
  • Know how to use audits to sustain workplace organization and to prevent backsliding.

Lesson 5 | Error-Proofing Overview

  • Understand the error-proofing mindset.
  • Be aware of common error-proofing techniques.
  • Comprehend the Transaction Model (consisting of the server-side and customer-side.)
  • Know how to use basic root cause analysis tools.

Lesson 6 | TPM for Business Processes

  • Be aware of TPM's impact on the Seven Wastes.
  • Recognize TPM's influence on reliability and uptime of business process support systems.
  • Begin measuring Overall Equipment Effectiveness.

Lesson 7 | Lean Business Process Measures

  • Measure Lean efforts by tracking Process Cycle Efficiency trends.
  • Create a Balanced Scorecard to track waste reduction.
  • Audit 5S activities to maintain workplace organization momentum.
  • Monitor uptime, throughput rates and yields using Overall Equipment Effectiveness.
  • Develop two-dimensional surveys to gather meaningful customer feedback.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this course.

Lean Business Processes Course Objectives

  • Understand the Seven Wastes and be able to actively support efforts to reduce them.
  • Recognize value-added from the customer's perspective.
  • Use Brown-Paper Flowcharts, Workflow Diagrams and Value Stream Maps to document current processes.
  • "Question" workflows to identify non-value-adding activities and tasks.
  • Develop a plan to simplify and streamline workflows.
  • Support a 5S effort in their work area.
  • Understand the power of error-proofing to prevent future problems.
  • Assist a Business Process TPM effort.
  • Be able to track macro measures of the Lean initiative.

Lean Manufacturing for Job Shops Course Outline

Unit 1 Adapting Lean to Job Shops

Lesson 1 | Does Lean Really Apply?

  • Appreciate the Realities that Job Shops must contend with.
  • Be aware of the consequences of those Realities.
  • Realize that Lean approaches can be modified and adapted to deal with Job Shop Realities.

Lesson 2 | Lean Job Shop Terminology

  • Define key Lean manufacturing terms.
  • Describe vital Lean tools.
  • Be familiar with additive Lean techniques.

Lesson 3 | Wastes in Job Shop Terms

  • Identify the seven wastes.
  • Explain value-adding versus non-value adding.
  • Define value from the customer's perspective.
  • Briefly describe how each of the seven wastes detracts from the value of a process' output.

Lesson 4 | Linking Realities to Wastes

  • Associate Job Shop Realities with the Seven Wastes.
  • Uncover patterns of how the effects of Job Shop Realities lead to Waste.
  • Discover common themes of the effects and the corresponding impact on Waste.
  • Recognize potential root causes of the common themes.

Lesson 5 | Preview of the Means

  • Understand that Lean practices can be adapted to a Job Shop environment by developing a compelling Message, building Momentum and making structural changes (the Means.)
  • Become aware that the Means can be a combination of the 5S's, Set-up Reduction, Workflow/Layout adjustments, TPM and Visual Workplace practices.

Unit 1 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 2 Lean Job Shop Practices

Lesson 1 | Message, Momentum and Means

  • Become familiar with how a three-phased approach (Message, Momentum and Means) can be used to adapt Lean practices to a Job Shop environment.
  • Understand how the "Means" represent a series of interdependent action plans creating a robust approach to Lean.

Lesson 2 | Embrace the 5S's

  • Identify what each of the 5S's stands for and how it helps an organization reduce waste.
  • Understand the tactics/techniques to "sort" by determining what belongs and what does not belong in a work area.
  • Explain the rationale for effective storage locations.
  • Describe what it means to standardize and why standardization is important.
  • Identify strategies to sustain workplace organization and to prevent backsliding.

Lesson 3 | Reduce Set-Up Time

  • Describe the purpose and benefits of reducing set-up time.
  • Explain the difference between internal and external set-up time.
  • Identify the key components of set-up reduction and explain the role each plays in reducing set-up time.

Lesson 4 | Adjust Workflows and Layouts

  • Explain the linkage between layouts and workflows.
  • Describe why identification of Product Families is an important step for improving layouts and subsequent workflows.
  • Understand types of data needed to design effective layouts and workflows.
  • Identify major issues for selecting layout and corresponding Macro-Workflow from various options.
  • Understand factors to be considered to refine Micro-Workflows.

Lesson 5 | TPM Basics

  • Explain how TPM aids Lean efforts and addresses wastes.
  • Know the difference between Corrective Maintenance , Preventive Maintenance (PM) and Predictive Maintenance (PdM).
  • Understand how the three sequential Phases of TPM build on each other.
  • Realize how PdM techniques can further traditional PM practices.

Lesson 6 | The Visual Workplace

  • Describe what is meant by the Visual Workplace.
  • Understand the meaning of Visual Controls, Prompts and Displays.
  • Appreciate how powerful visual aids, supports and alerts can be to make it easer to do things the right way and reduce waste.

Lesson 7 | Track and Improve

  • Understand why it is important to measure the progress of action plans.
  • Be familiar with potential measures for Lean Job Shop action plans.

Unit 2 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Lean Manufacturing for Job Shops Course Objectives

Unit 1 | Adapting Lean to Job Shops

  • Realize that Lean approaches can be modified and adapted to deal with Job Shop Realities.
  • Define key Lean manufacturing terms.
  • Describe vital Lean tools.
  • Be familiar with additive Lean techniques.
  • Identify the Seven Wastes and briefly describe how each of the Seven Wastes detracts from the value of a process' output
  • Uncover patterns of how the effects of Job Shop Realities lead to Waste.
  • Understand that Lean practices can be adapted to a Job Shop environment by developing a compelling Message, building Momentum and making structural changes (the Means.)
  • Become aware that the Means can be a combination of the 5S's, Set-up Reduction, Workflow/Layout adjustments, TPM and Visual Workplace practices.

Unit 2 | Lean Job Shop Practices

  • Become familiar with how a three-phased approach (Message, Momentum and Means) can be used to adapt Lean practices and understand how the "Means" represent a series of interdependent action plans.
  • Identify what each of the 5S's stands for and how it helps an organization reduce waste.
  • Identify the key components of set-up reduction and explain the role each plays in reducing set-up time.
  • Understand the linkage between layouts and workflows and know how to adjust layouts to make workflows more effective.
  • Know the difference between Corrective Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance (PM) and Predictive Maintenance (PdM) and how to incorporate appropriate maintenance practices to improve equipment reliability.
  • Appreciate how powerful visual aids, supports and alerts can be incorporated to make it easier to do things the right way and reduce waste.
  • Be able to use measures to track and evaluate Lean Job Shop action plans.

Visual Workplace Basics Course Outline

Lesson 1 | What is the Visual Workplace

  • Describe what is meant by the Visual Workplace.
  • List the underlying tenets of Visual Workplace.
  • Understand the meaning of Visual Controls, Prompts and Displays.

Lesson 2 | Visual Workplace Techniques

  • Identify candidates for the use of Visual Workplace techniques.
  • Explain how visual aids, supports and alerts can make it easier to do things the right way and reduce waste.
  • List specific examples of Visual Controls, Visual Prompts and Visual Displays.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this course.

Visual Workplace Basics Course Objectives

  • Describe what is meant by the Visual Workplace.
  • List the underlying tenets of Visual Workplace.
  • Understand the meaning of Visual Controls, Prompts and Displays.
  • Identify candidates for the use of Visual Workplace techniques.
  • Explain how visual aids, supports and alerts can make it easier to do things the right way and reduce waste.
  • List specific examples of Visual Controls, Visual Prompts and Visual Displays.

Lean Manufacturing Course Outline

Unit 1 Lean Concepts

Lesson 1 | Why Lean?

  • Be customer focused: Be on-time, responsive, flexible, and fast.
  • Simplify and standardize workflows: Mimic continuous flow, minimize WIP, use visible measures.
  • Manage capacity: Increase process uptime, reduce set-up times, find "lost" capacity.
  • Eliminate waste: Identify non-value adding activities, then modify, combine, or eliminate those tasks.
  • JiT: Not too early and never late; not just-in-case inventory but just-in-time production and delivery; products must always be made right the first time; equipment must always work when needed.

Lesson 2 | Lean Terminology

  • Terms
  • Tools
  • Techniques

Lesson 3 | Eliminate Waste

  • Match lot sizes to customer demands: Use kanbans; end WIP.
  • Use pull scheduling instead of push scheduling.
  • Schedule to the rate-determining step (the bottleneck), then de-bottleneck process lines.
  • Facilitate fast feedback: Arrange sequential operations next to each other to ensure fast feedback from internal customer operations to internal supplier operations if something in-process is not right.

Lesson 4 | Components of Lean

  • Overview of the 8 Components of Lean: Value Stream Mapping, Workplace Organization, Predictability and Consistency, Set-up Reduction, TPM, Visual Factory, Support Processes, and Continuous Improvement.

Lesson 5 | Value Stream Analysis

  • Map the process from incoming order to outgoing product: Define process goals, create the current state map, and establish process metrics.
  • Use the current state map to identify potential improvements, conceive the future state.

Lesson 6 | The Lean Mindset

  • Eliminating waste is not limited to manufacturing; the same techniques apply to the office, sales, finance, maintenance, and even RandD processes and procedures.
  • Lean and Six Sigma are complementary.

Unit 1 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 2 Lean Practices

Lesson 1 | Streamlining the Value Stream

  • Identify process goals.
  • Collect and analyze process data.
  • Create a macro-facility workflow to determine how to minimize high volume travel distances.
  • Conduct a micro-process workflow to apply cellular concepts, identify and remove bottlenecks, and move to pull manufacturing with kanbans.

Lesson 2 | Workplace Organization

  • Apply the 5Ss: Sort (clearing the work area), Set in Order (designating locations), Shine (cleanliness and workplace appearance), Standardize (everyone doing things the same way), and Sustain (ingraining it in the culture).

Lesson 3 | Predictability and Consistency

  • Use DFA/DFM to design quality in.
  • Conduct GRandRs to ensure reliable measurement systems are in place.
  • Employ SPC to help ensure processes are predictable and stable.
  • Reduce variation and improve process capability with DOE.
  • Eliminate the root cause of defects using problem-solving and mistake-proofing.
  • Move to Six Sigma quality.

Lesson 4 | Set-Up Reduction

  • Apply SMED concepts.
  • Separate external tasks (external to the process) from internal tasks.

Lesson 5 | TPM

  • TPM versus PM
  • Develop operator involvement in the equipment and begin predictive maintenance practices.

Lesson 6 | Visual Workplace

  • Visual Workplace
  • Use status display of performance for dashboard or balanced measures and COQ results.
  • Visual controls, such as sensory alerts, indicate if something is out of place.
  • Marking on the floor, kanbans, andons, and panel-alarms all help build a visual control infrastructure.

Lesson 7 | Support Processes

  • Lean techniques require changes in Purchasing, Scheduling, Warehousing/Shipping, and Accounting practices.

Lesson 8 | Continuous Improvement

  • Fight NIH (not-invented-here) attitudes and leverage successes.
  • Use kaizen events for rapid, targeted improvements to achieve the future state.
  • Use a standardized Problem-Solving Model (e.g. DMAIC or 8D).
  • Begin an employee idea system.

Unit 2 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 3 Implementing Lean

Lesson 1 | Lean Starts with People

  • Lean Starts with People
  • Communicate the why, what, how, and who.
  • Provide education in the concepts.
  • Train employees in tools and techniques as needed to achieve a flexible workforce.

Lesson 2 | Data Drives Lean

  • Focus efforts on projects that lead to tangible savings.
  • Calculation techniques to generate data include: Time studies, equipment loading, TAKT time, staffing requirements, process yields, and COQ.
  • Sample Worksheets covered include: Lean Project Summary; Cell Target Worksheet; Data Collection Form for Basic Equipment and Utility Parameters; Value-Adding Analysis Worksheet; Process Change-Over/Setup Worksheet; Set-Up Reduction Worksheet; and Lot Size Worksheet.

Lesson 3 | Layout Options

  • Improved layouts are about moving cubic feet (not numbers of items), eliminating crossover points, arranging the process in the natural flow order; linking processes to minimize time and distance; moving equipment together to simulate a continuous process flow; and putting internal customers and suppliers next to each other.
  • Be careful to identify anchors or monuments; do not move them.
  • Typical layout options are explored.

Lesson 4 | Lean Inventory Practices

  • Minimize trips to and from the warehouse by designing the warehouse to work for you.
  • Use ABC inventory categories to prioritize inventory needs and storage locations.

Lesson 5 | Roadmap for Lean

  • Start with the people issues.
  • Focus on workplace organization (the 5S's), then, use value stream analysis and process workflow analysis to establish effective layouts.
  • Where to focus next depends on specific needs.
  • Use targeted Kaizen events to speed changes.
  • Do not overlook the need to modify support processes (especially scheduling and purchasing).

Lesson 6 | Lean Pitfalls

  • Not documenting the financial impact/savings.
  • Lack of commitment from leadership.
  • Using traditional purchasing practices.
  • Not changing scheduling techniques.
  • Failure to address workforce issues.
  • Not mistake-proofing the root cause.
  • Thinking Lean is just for manufacturing.
  • Not using beneficial technology.
  • Not leveraging successes.
  • Getting too lean.
  • Failure to hold the gains.

Unit 3 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Lean Manufacturing Course Objectives

Unit 1 | Lean Concepts

  • Understand the reasons for implementing lean.
  • Learn the terms, tools, and techniques used in lean.
  • Identify the types of waste that can be eliminated with lean.
  • Describe the components and elements of a lean effort.
  • Explain value stream mapping, techniques for analyzing the current state map and for envisioning the future state of the workflow.
  • Describe why and how lean can apply to finance, maintenance, sales and R&D processes.
  • Compare and contract the linkages and differences between lean and six sigma initiatives.

Unit 2 | Lean Practices

  • Streamlining the Value Stream: Learn how to use value stream maps to create macro-facility workflows and micro-process workflows.
  • Workplace Organization: Understand how the 5S's establish a structured approach for storing materials, supplies, and equipment in work areas.
  • Predictability & Consistency: Discover how quality improvement techniques such as GR&Rs, SPC, DOE, DFA/DFM, and (especially) mistake-proofing help prevent problems and lead to robust processes.
  • Set-Up Reduction: Investigate how to slash set-up and change-over times and understand how important fast set-ups are to lean efforts.
  • TPM: Learn how to improve equipment reliability by applying TPM methods.
  • Visual Workplace: See how visual controls and visual displays reinforce and enhances a lean effort.
  • Support Processes: Recognize how important lean scheduling, lean purchasing, lean accounting, and lean warehousing practices are to supporting and sustaining a lean manufacturing effort.
  • Continuous Improvement: Explore the options for keeping a lean effort viable and vital.

Unit 3 | Implementing Lean

  • Understand how important it is to address people issues as cross-training and flexible staffing practices are introduced.
  • Review the types and forms of data needed to support lean implementation.
  • Explore forms used to help plan and track lean efforts.
  • Investigate layout options and methods to determine the best option for your workflow and facility.
  • Learn how a lean warehouse complements lean manufacturing.
  • Review a systematic roadmap for introducing and implementing lean.
  • Explore 12 common lean pitfalls and learn how to avoid them.

Overview of Lean Course Outline

Lesson 1 | Why Lean?

  • Be customer focused: Be on-time, responsive, flexible, and fast.
  • Simplify and standardize workflows: Mimic continuous flow, minimize WIP, use visible measures.
  • Manage capacity: Increase process uptime, reduce set-up times, find "lost" capacity.
  • Eliminate waste: Identify non-value adding activities, then modify, combine, or eliminate those tasks.
  • JiT: Not too early and never late; not just-in-case inventory but just-in-time production and delivery; products must always be made right the first time; equipment must always work when needed.

Lesson 2 | Eliminate Waste

  • Elimination of waste starts with identification of waste. Anything that does not add value is classified as waste.
  • Waste can be classified into seven categories: Waiting, Transportation, Processing, Motion, Quality, Inventory and Overproduction.

Lesson 3 | Components of Lean

  • Overview of the 8 Components of Lean: Value Stream Mapping, Workplace Organization, Predictability and Consistency, Set-up Reduction, TPM, Visual Factory, Support Processes, and Continuous Improvement.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this course.

Overview of Lean Course Objectives

  • Describe the key concepts of lean manufacturing.
  • Name and describe the seven wastes.
  • Briefly describe how each of the seven wastes add costs to a process.
  • Define value-adding and non-value adding.
  • List the eight components of lean and define each.

Lean Mindset Course Outline

Lesson 1 | Why Lean?

  • Be customer focused: Be on-time, responsive, flexible, and fast.
  • Simplify and standardize workflows: Mimic continuous flow, minimize WIP, use visible measures.
  • Manage capacity: Increase process uptime, reduce set-up times, find "lost" capacity.
  • Eliminate waste: Identify non-value adding activities, then modify, combine, or eliminate those tasks.
  • JiT: Not too early and never late; not just-in-case inventory but just-in-time production and delivery; products must always be made right the first time; equipment must always work when needed.

Lesson 2 | Lean Terminology

  • Terms
  • Tools
  • Techniques

Lesson 3 | Streamlining the Value Stream

  • Identify process goals.
  • Collect and analyze process data.
  • Create a macro-facility workflow to determine how to minimize high volume travel distances.
  • Conduct a micro-process workflow to apply cellular concepts, identify and remove bottlenecks, and move to pull manufacturing with kanbans.

Lesson 4 | Continuous Improvement

  • Fight NIH (not-invented-here) attitudes and leverage successes.
  • Use kaizen events for rapid, targeted improvements to achieve the future state.
  • Use a standardized Problem-Solving Model (e.g. DMAIC or 8D).
  • Begin an employee idea system.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this course.

Lean Mindset Course Objectives

  • Explain why it is important that lean not just be used in manufacturing, but throughout the organization.
  • Describe the benefits of lean in the office, maintenance, R&D, and Sales.
  • Define key lean terms and know how to apply lean terminology.
  • Understand the purpose of streamlining the value stream.
  • Describe the steps to streamline a workflow.
  • Identify the key characteristics of a lean value stream.
  • Compare and contrast the difference between a macro and micro workflow.
  • Describe the impact of a bottleneck on a process.
  • Explain what "If it's not broke, fix it anyway." means.
  • Identify activities that can help you learn from others outside of your organization.
  • Describe the benefits of cross-training.

Lean Support Processes Course Outline

Lesson 1 | Support Processes

  • Lean techniques require changes in Purchasing, Scheduling, Warehousing/Shipping, and Accounting practices.

Lesson 2 | Lean Starts with People

  • Lean Starts with People
  • Communicate the why, what, how, and who.
  • Provide education in the concepts.
  • Train employees in tools and techniques as needed to achieve a flexible workforce.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this course.

Lean Support Processes Course Objectives

  • Describe the role that support departments play in Lean Manufacturing.
  • Define what "lower cost of ownership" means.
  • Explain how bottlenecks are handled when scheduling in a lean operation.
  • Explain why lean manufacturing requires skilled workers and effective leaders.
  • Describe what "cross-functional and interdependent departments" means.
  • Define customer-focused and flexible, adaptable, and resourceful and explain what they mean to a lean environment.