Belt Training

Yellow Belt Curriculum

A Yellow Belt is one step up from a beginner, yet with solid training can work effectively as a member of a problem-solving team.

Lean Six Sigma uses the analogy of belt colors (traditionally associated with martial arts) to designate competence in applying lean six sigma tools to problem solving and process improvement. A Yellow Belt is usually the first step in the progression to become an expert in Lean Six Sigma.

A Yellow Belt is one step up from a beginner, yet with solid training can work effectively as a member of a problem-solving team. With the guidance of other, more experienced team members (Green Belts) and facilitation by experts (Black Belts), Yellow Belts will eventually also be able to apply basic problem-solving techniques to make improvements in their own work areas.

Yellow Belt Courses

Our Yellow Belt Curriculum starts with a short introduction to the basic concepts of Lean Six Sigma. After that our mistake-proofing training challenges learners to think differently about problem-solving than they likely have in the past by making it impossible to make mistakes. Finally, Yellow Belt trainees are inspired to start improving their own work areas with our 5S’s:  Workplace Organization course.

How to Purchase a Curriculum

Options for Manufacturing and Non-Manufacturing versions of the Mistake-Proofing course assures that the examples throughout the training resonate and are relevant for learners.

Manufacturing Version

Best for people who work in manufacturing settings.

  • Introduction to Lean Six Sigma
  • Mistake-Proofing
  • 5S’s: Workplace Organization

Non-Manufacturing Version

Ideal for people who work in support areas or in the service sector.

  • Introduction to Lean Six Sigma
  • Error-Proofing Business Processes
  • 5S’s: Workplace Organization
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How to Purchase Curriculums

Curriculums are purchased the same as any of our courses - you purchase credits and then assign courses to learners.

To determine how many credits you need to purchase, use this table:

Multiply the number of credits for your chosen curriculum by the number of learners you wish to train. This is the number of credits you need to purchase.

Introduction to Lean Six Sigma Course Outline

Lesson 1 | What is Lean Six Sigma

  • Lean Six Sigma Philosophy
  • Lean Six Sigma Methodologies

Lesson 2 | Improvement Methodologies

  • Value Stream Mapping
  • Elimination of Waste
  • The 5S's
  • The DMAIC Project Cycle

Lesson 3 | Supporting Infrastructure

  • Components in the Supporting Infrastructure:
  • Leadership team
  • Champions
  • Black Belts
  • Green Belts
  • Project Teams
  • Subject Matter Experts
  • DMAIC Project Management

Lesson 4 | Application and Outcomes

  • Lean Six Sigma in:
    • Manufacturing
    • The "Office"
    • Order Entry
    • Warehousing and Distribution
    • Sales
    • R and D

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this course.

Introduction to Lean Six Sigma Course Objectives

  • Understand the scope and breadth of a Lean Six Sigma initiative.
  • Gain an understanding of what waste is and how to identify it so that it can be reduced.
  • Become aware of variation and techniques to reduce it.
  • Become familiar with the DMAIC and 8D team project models.
  • Be aware of the infrastructure needed to support a Lean Six Sigma effort.

Mistake-Proofing Training Course Outline

Unit 1 Mistake-Proofing Primer

Lesson 1 | What is Mistake-Proofing?

  • Rewriting Murphy's Laws.
  • Exploring the source of mistakes.
  • The mindset necessary for mistake-proofing.

Lesson 2 | Mistake-Proofing in Everyday Life

  • Common examples of mistake-proofing all around us.
  • Using these examples to trigger ideas at work.

Lesson 3 | Why Errors Are Made

  • How process inputs create process outputs.
  • Why the root causes of errors must be identified.

Lesson 4 | Inspecting vs. Mistake-Proofing

  • The limitations of inspection.
  • Why prevention is always more powerful than detection.

Lesson 5 | How Mistake-Proofing Works

  • The language of mistake-proofing.
  • The role of teams in mistake-proofing efforts.

Unit 1 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 2 Effects of Mistake-Proofing

Lesson 1 | Approaches to Mistake-Proofing

  • Exploring the 8 forms of mistake-proofing solutions.
  • Guidelines for selecting a mistake-proofing approach.

Lesson 2 | Forced Control Devices

  • Delving into the four families of devices and methods used to achieve a forced control effect.

Lesson 3 | Shutdown Devices

  • Examining 10 common families of sensors used to achieve a shutdown effect.

Lesson 4 | Warning Devices

  • Investigating 4 families of audible alarms and 4 families of visual alarms used to achieve a warning effect.

Lesson 5 | Sensory Alert Devices

  • A look at the use of color-coding, missing-in-action clues, and other aids to achieve a sensory alert effect.

Unit 2 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 3 Implementing Mistake-Proofing Solutions

Lesson 1 | Integrating Mistake-Proofing and Problem Solving

  • How to incorporate mistake-proofing solutions into common problem-solving processes.

Lesson 2 | Practical, Feasible, and Cost Effective Solutions

  • Assessment techniques for determining the practicality, feasibility, and cost-effectiveness of your mistake-proofing solutions.

Lesson 3 | How to Keep Solutions from Being Overridden

  • Tips for keeping your mistake-proofing solution from being ignored or disabled.

Lesson 4 | How Robust is Your Solution?

  • Assessment techniques for determining how robust your mistake-proofing solutions are.

Lesson 5 | Complementary Tools

  • How to use ten continuous improvement tools to complement mistake-proofing efforts.

Unit 3 Challenge

An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 4 Mistake-Proofing in Action

Lesson 1 | Mistake-Proofing in High Volume Manufacturing

  • Nowhere are the benefits of mistake-proofing more evident than in high volume operations.
  • 8 real-life examples of mistake-proofing solutions in a high volume environment.

Lesson 2 | Mistake-Proofing in Assembly Operations

  • Mistake-proofing is a perfect tool to prevent assembly errors.
  • 8 real-life examples of mistake-proofing solutions in assembly operations.

Lesson 3 | Mistake-Proofing in a Job Shop Environment

  • Mistake-proofing in short-run job shops can make the difference between profitability and bankruptcy.
  • 8 real-life examples of mistake-proofing solutions in a job shop environment.

Lesson 4 | Mistake-Proofing in Process Industries

  • Mistake-proofing is at the core of complex chemical operations.
  • 8 real-life examples of common sense mistake-proofing solutions from the process industry that can trigger ideas to simplify your operation.

Lesson 5 | Mistake-Proofing in Equipment Set-up

  • Mistake-proofing is an important element of set-up reduction.
  • 8 real-life examples of mistake-proofing solutions to aid equipment set-up and speed product change-overs.

Lesson 6 | Mistake-Proofing in the Office

  • Mistake-proofing is not just for plant operations.
  • 8 real-life examples of mistake-proofing solutions in the office.

Mistake-Proofing Training Course Objectives

Unit 1 | Mistake-Proofing Primer

  • Understand the goal of mistake-proofing.
  • Know the language of mistake-proofing.
  • Recognize mistake-proofing solutions in everyday life and use these solutions as triggers for ideas to mistake-proof your processes.
  • Identify the five process input elements that exist in any process.
  • Recognize why errors are made.
  • See the value of improving processes so that mistakes are prevented instead of relying on inspection to find mistakes.

Unit 2 | Effects of Mistake-Proofing

  • Be able to rank the relative power of the different forms of mistake-proofing effects.
  • Recognize a forced control effect. Be able to apply:
    • Elimination
    • Combination
    • Guides
    • Process control
  • Have an understanding of some of the types of sensors available to achieve a shutdown effect.
  • Have an understanding of some of the types of devices available to create a mistake-proofing solution using a warning effect.
  • Know how to apply sensory alert effects to mistake-proofing.

Unit 3 | Implementing Mistake-Proofing Solutions

  • Learn to apply mistake-proofing solutions after the root cause has been found.
  • Be able to evaluate whether the mistake-proofing solution is practical, feasible, and cost-effective.
  • Learn how to build-in ways to assure your solution does not get overridden.
  • Evaluate the robustness level of your solution.
  • Become familiar with 10 improvement tools that complement the mistake-proofing process.

Unit 4 | Mistake-Proofing in Action

In this unit, recurring problems from a variety of industrial settings are explored and successful mistake-proofing solutions are shown. The problems come from the following industrial settings:

  • High volume manufacturing.
  • Assembly operations.
  • A job shop environment.
  • Process industries.
  • Equipment set-up.
  • In the office.

The primary objective of this Unit is to expose you to a variety of mistake-proofing solutions to help you develop your own mistake-proofing solutions.

The secondary objective is to help you think through the solution presented and then identify what type of solution has been used.

5S's Workplace Organization Course Outline

Unit 1 The 5S’s Step-by-Step

Lesson 1 | What is 5S All About?

  • An overview of the 5S's.
  • The benefits and operational impact of implementing the 5S's.

Lesson 2 | Sort: Clearing the Work Area

  • How to organize the work area for efficiency and effectiveness and use the "48-Hour Rule."
  • A stepwise approach to clear the work area.

Lesson 3 | Set in Order: Designated Locations

  • How to designate "a place for everything" and ensure "everything is in its place."
  • Considerations for establishing locations for storing items including: storage rationale, storage options, location-specific tips, storage don'ts, using signs and labels and documenting the plan.

Lesson 4 | Shine: Cleanliness and Workplace Appearance

  • The three aspects of Shine: getting the workplace clean, maintaining its appearance, and using preventive measures to keep it clean.

Lesson 5 | Standardize: Everyone Doing Things the Same Way

  • How to design systems that helps ensure that everyone does things the same way with full involvement, standardized training, and a "copy exactly" mindset.

Lesson 6 | Sustain: Ingrain It in the Culture

  • How to implement techniques to prevent backsliding to sustain and ingrain workplace organization

Unit 1 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 2 5S Implementation

Lesson 1 | An Organization-Wide 5S Effort

  • How to plan and implement a 5S initiative.
  • An 8-point roadmap to implement the 5S's: 1: Leadership Team; 2: Infrastructure; 3: Communications; 4: Training; 5: 5S Pilots; 6: Best Practices; 7: Full Roll-Out Plan; 8: Evaluate and Adjust.

Lesson 2 | Tackling 5S's on Your Own

  • How to implement the 5S's in a work area if an organization-wide initiative is not supported.

Lesson 3 | Success Stories: Sorts

  • Examples of "Sort Successes" showing both the before-state and the after-state with the impact (savings) explained.
  • Checklist to help achieve successful Sorts.

Lesson 4 | Success Stories: Set in Order

  • Examples of "Set in Order Successes" showing both the before-state and the after-state complete with the impact on the organization.
  • Set in Order Checklists.

Lesson 5 | Success Stories: Shine, Standardize and Sustain

  • Examples of successful approaches for the Shine, Standardize and Sustain phases of a 5S program

Unit 2 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

5S's Workplace Organization Course Objectives

Unit 1 | The 5S's Step-by-Step

In this unit learners will be introduced to the five core components of the 5S's:

  • Sort: Sort out items not needed in the work area and disposition those items to be removed.
  • Set in Order: Select the best locations and ways to store items used in the work area using a structured rationale and knowledge of storage options.
  • Shine: Get the workplace clean; then maintain the appearance of the workplace and institute preventive measures to ensure it stays clean.
  • Standardize: Design systems in place to ensure everyone does things the same way, implement techniques to ingrain a "copy exactly" mind set, and leverage Best Practices.
  • Sustain: Learn how to prevent backsliding and build the 5S's into the culture of the organization.

Unit 2 | 5S Implementation

In this unit, learners explore approaches to implement the 5S's in their organization (or work area); examples of successes for each 5S phase are included.

  • Organization-Wide Implementation: Work though an 8-point checklist to plan an organization-wide implementation of the 5S's.
  • Work Area Implementation: Use a 6-point checklist to plan your work area 5S effort if a site-wide 5S implementation is not supported.
  • Sort Successes: Explore examples of "Sort Successes" to trigger ideas for your 5S effort.
  • Set in Order Successes: Use lessons learned from "Set in Order Successes" to fuel your 5S effort.
  • Shine, Standardize, & Sustain Successes: Adopt the examples discussed to build success factors into your Shine, Standardize, and Sustain efforts.

8D Problem-Solving Course Outline

Lesson 1 | Discipline D1

  • Use a Team Approach
  • Form an effective project team.
  • Define roles of the team members.
  • Set boundaries of freedom for the team.
  • Help get the team started up.

Lesson 2 | Discipline D2

  • Describe the Problem
  • Understand the scope and magnitude of the problem.
  • Develop a Problem Statement.
  • Recognize that the task is to investigate the problem, not jump to solutions.

Lesson 3 | Discipline D3

  • Interim Containment
  • Determine if Interim Containment is needed.
  • Design and put temporary measures into place to "buy time" until a permanent solution can be developed and implemented.
  • Verify that interim containment measures are working.

Lesson 4 | Discipline D4

  • Define the Root Causes
  • Use process mapping techniques to clarify the bounds of the process.
  • Identify relationships between causes and the resulting effect using Cause and Effect Diagrams.
  • Collect data and then use data display tools to visually analyze that data.
  • Use Investigative Tools to uncover more clues to the root cause.
  • Conduct confirmation runs to verify that the root cause has been found.

Lesson 5 | Discipline D5

  • Develop Solutions
  • Identify potential solutions that address the root cause.
  • Consider solution candidates that will prevent the root cause from recurring as well as detection approaches that warn if the problem may recur.
  • Remove candidates that are not practical, feasible or cost-effective from consideration.
  • Use decision matrices to select the most balanced solution.

Lesson 6 | Discipline D6

  • Implement the Solution
  • Understand how to develop Action Plans using either Simple or Complex Action Plans formats.
  • Learn how to use Project Management tools such as Activity Plans, PERT Charts and Gantt Charts to develop Action Plans to manage and track implementation of the solution.
  • Recognize that the solution has been not fully implemented until related documentation is updated and communication has been completed with all involved parties.

Lesson 7 | Discipline D7

  • Prevent Recurrence
  • Use techniques to ensure the problem does not recur.
  • Know which associated documents and systems to update.
  • Remove Interim Containment measures.
  • Recognize how powerful it can be to share LESSONs Learned.

Lesson 8 | Discipline D8

  • Congratulate the Team
  • Encourage the organization to recognize the problem-solving team for a job well done.
  • Ensure the problem-solving team recognizes those that have assisted them.

Course Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this course.

8D Problem-Solving Course Objectives

  • Learn how to use the 8-Discipline process to work through and solve a problem in a team.
  • Use problem-solving tools and techniques to collect and analyze data, make decisions and evaluate the effectiveness of an implemented solution.
  • Document team progress and solutions using forms and worksheets.

DMAIC Basics Course Outline

Lesson 1 | Introduction

  • What is DMAIC and how does it compare to other problem-solving models?

Lesson 2 | Define

  • Establish a project (problem-solving) team and get the team started up.
  • Develop the Problem Statement.

Lesson 3 | Measure

  • Set up measurement systems so that the appropriate data needed to determine the root cause of the problem can be collected.
  • Assess measurement systems to make sure they are reliable.

Lesson 4 | Analyze

  • Use a systematic approach to collect, display, and analyze data to identify the root cause(s).
  • Verify that the cause(s) identified is truly the root cause.
  • Identify a solution to attack the root cause and correct the problem.

Lesson 5 | Improve

  • Execute the problem solution.
  • Develop simple and complex action plans.
  • Use Gantt Charts to plan the implementation and monitor progress.

Lesson 6 | Control

  • Ensure the solution is robust and well entrenched so that problem does not come back.
  • Provide training and start audit practices to complete transfer of the solution to the process owners.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this course.

DMAIC Basics Course Objectives

  • Describe each of the steps of the DMAIC process.
  • Learn how to use a structured process to solve problems.
  • Work on a problem-solving team.
  • Use data collection and analysis tools to find and solve problems.
  • Ensure that solutions are robust, effective and continue to work.

Basic SPC Course Outline

Unit 1 Statistics Primer

Lesson 1 | Introduction to Variation

  • What variation is and why it's a problem in manufacturing.

Lesson 2 | Measuring Variation

  • Using a histogram to measure the variation in a process.

Lesson 3 | Patterns of Variation

  • Types of patterns of variation, what they tell you, and what to do about them.

Lesson 4 | Measures of Variation

  • Statistical measures of variation: Mean, range, and standard deviation.

Lesson 5 | Normal Curve

  • Properties of the normal curve and the 68, 95, 99.7 rule.

Lesson 6 | Stability

  • The importance of a stable process in manufacturing.

Unit Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 2 Using Control Charts

Lesson 1 | What are Control Charts

  • What control charts are and why they are used.

Lesson 2 | What a Control Chart Looks Like

  • Common elements of all control charts.

Lesson 3 | Interpreting Control Charts & Taking Action

  • Out-of-control patterns and what to do when they occur.

Lesson 4 | Types of Control Charts

  • Variable and attribute control charts: Which do you use when?

Lesson 5 | Using Variable Control Charts

  • Calculating and plotting data on variable control charts and interpreting the chart.

Lesson 6 | Using Attribute Control Charts

  • Calculating and plotting data on attribute control charts and interpreting the chart.

Unit Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 3 Process Capability Basics

Lesson 1 | What is Process Capability

  • What process capability means and why it's important.

Lesson 2 | Measuring Process Capability

  • The capability ratio, process capability index, and Cpk.

Unit Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Basic SPC Course Objectives

Unit 1 | Statistics Primer

  • Explain what variation in a work process is and why it is bad.
  • Describe key techniques for measuring variation - visual display and mathematical.
  • Identify key patterns of variation and explain what causes them.

Unit 2 | Using Control Chart

  • Understand the purpose of a control chart.
  • Identify key parts of a control chart.
  • Know how to collect and plot data on a control chart.
  • Be able to interpret and take action using a control chart.

Unit 3 | Process Capability Basics

  • Describe what is meant by a capable process.
  • Contrast the difference between an "in-spec" process and a "capable process."
  • Identify and explain the three main measures of process capability.

Basic SPC for Business Processes Course Outline

Unit 1 Statistics Primer

Lesson 1 | Introduction to Variation

  • What variation is and why it's a problem in manufacturing.

Lesson 2 | Measuring Variation

  • Using a histogram to measure the variation in a process.

Lesson 3 | Patterns of Variation

  • Types of patterns of variation, what they tell you, and what to do about them.

Lesson 4 | Measures of Variation

  • Statistical measures of variation: Mean, range, and standard deviation.

Lesson 5 | Normal Curve

  • Properties of the normal curve and the 68, 95, 99.7 rule.

Lesson 6 | Stability

  • The importance of a stable process in manufacturing.

Unit Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this Unit.

Unit 2 Using Control Charts

Lesson 1 - What are Control Charts

  • What control charts are and why they are used.

Lesson 2 | What a Control Chart Looks Like

  • Common elements of all control charts.

Lesson 3 | Interpreting Control Charts and Taking Action

  • Out-of-control patterns and what to do when they occur.

Lesson 4 | Types of Control Charts

  • Variable and attribute control charts: Which do you use when?

Lesson 5 | Using Variable Control Charts

  • Calculating and plotting data on variable control charts and interpreting the chart.

Lesson 6 | Using Attribute Control Charts

  • Calculating and plotting data on attribute control charts and interpreting the chart.

Unit Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this Unit.

Unit 3 Process Capability Basics

Lesson 1 | What is Process Capability

  • What process capability means and why it's important.

Lesson 2 | Measuring Process Capability

  • The capability ratio, process capability index, and Cpk.

Unit Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this Unit.

Basic SPC for Business Processes Course Objectives

Unit 1 | Statistics Primer

  • Explain what variation in a work process is and why it is bad.
  • Describe key techniques for measuring variation - visual display and mathematical.
  • Identify key patterns of variation and explain what causes them.

Unit 2 | Using Control Chart

  • Understand the purpose of a control chart.
  • Identify key parts of a control chart.
  • Know how to collect and plot data on a control chart.
  • Be able to interpret and take action using a control chart.

Unit 3 | Process Capability Basics

  • Describe what is meant by a capable process.
  • Contrast the difference between an "in-spec" process and a "capable process."
  • Identify and explain the three main measures of process capability.

FMEA Training Course Outline

Unit 1 FMEA Overview

Lesson 1 | Introduction

  • An overview of what an FMEA is; how the FMEA process works; and why an FMEA is used.

Lesson 2 | Purpose of an FMEA

  • An explanation of how an FMEA helps identify risks, prioritizes the risks relative to one another, and focuses efforts on an action plan to reduce the risks.

Lesson 3 | Tie to Quality Standards

  • An overview of the links between FMEAs and Quality Standards such as ISO 9001 and TS 16949.

Lesson 4 | DFMEA or PFMEA?

  • An explanation of the differences between a Design-FMEA and a Process-FMEA.

Lesson 5 | The FMEA Process

  • A preview of the 10 steps used to conduct an FMEA. The same basic steps apply to both a DFMEA and a PFMEA.

Lesson 6 | Assembling an FMEA Team

  • Helpful hints on assembling an effective FMEA team.

Unit 1 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 2 Design FMEAs

Lesson 1 | Design-FMEA Scope

  • How to clarify the scope for a DFMEA.
  • Details on how to use the DFMEA Scope Worksheet.

Lesson 2 | 10 Steps to Conduct a DFMEA

  • Step-by-step directions on conducting a DFMEA.
  • Guidance on the use of the FMEA Analysis Worksheet.
  • Techniques for customizing the Severity, Occurrence, and Detection Ranking Scales for a DFMEA.

Lesson 3 | DFMEAs and Control Plans

  • Using the DFMEA Analysis to develop input for a Process Control Plan.

Lesson 4 | Getting More Out of Your DFMEA

  • Tips on the best times in a product's life cycle to conduct a DFMEA.
  • Tips on how to use the results of an FMEA to trigger continuous improvement.

Lesson 5 | DFMEA Example

  • An example of the application of a DFMEA, working through all 10 steps.

Unit 2 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 3 Process FMEAs

Lesson 1 | Process-FMEA Scope

  • How to clarify the scope for a PFMEA.
  • Details on how to use the PFMEA Scope Worksheet.

Lesson 2 | 10 Steps to Conduct a PFMEA

  • Step-by-step directions on conducting a PFMEA.
  • Guidance on the use of the FMEA Analysis Worksheet.
  • Techniques for customizing the Severity, Occurrence, and Detection Ranking Scales for a PFMEA.

Lesson 3 | PFMEAs and Control Plans

  • Using the PFMEA Analysis to develop a proactive Control Plan.

Lesson 4 | Getting More Out of Your PFMEA

  • Tips on the best times and places to conduct a PFMEA.
  • Tips on how to use the results of an FMEA to trigger continuous improvement.

Lesson 5 | PFMEA Example

  • An example of the application of a PFMEA, working through all 10 steps.

Unit 3 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

FMEA Training Course Objectives

Unit 1 | FMEA Overview

  • Explain the purpose of conducting an FMEA.
  • Describe the link between FMEAs and ISO 9001, TS 16949 and other quality standards.
  • Determine when to use a Design-FMEA and when to use a Process-FMEA.
  • Explain the methodology of the FMEA process.
  • Assemble an FMEA team.

Unit 2 | Design FMEAs

  • Clarify the scope of a DFMEA.
  • Work through the 10 steps of a DFMEA.
  • Develop custom ranking scales for Severity, Occurrence, and Detection.
  • Determine which technology tools to use as aids in your DFMEA action plan.
  • Learn how to make the DFMEA into a living document.
  • Use the DFMEA establish the basis for a Control Plan.

Unit 3 | Process FMEAs

  • Clarify the scope of a PFMEA.
  • Work through the 10 steps of a PFMEA.
  • Develop custom ranking scales for Severity, Occurrence, and Detection.
  • Determine which technology tools to use as aids in your PFMEA action plan.
  • Link the PFMEA to a Control Plan.
  • Learn how to make the PFMEA into a living document.

FMEA for Business Processes Course Outline

Unit 1 FMEA Overview

Lesson 1 | Introduction

  • An overview of what an FMEA is; how the FMEA process works; and why an FMEA is used.

Lesson 2 | Purpose of an FMEA

  • An explanation of how an FMEA helps identify risks, prioritizes the risks relative to one another, and focuses efforts on an action plan to reduce the risks.

Lesson 3 | Tie to Quality Standards

  • An overview of the links between FMEAs and Quality Standards such as ISO 9001 and TS 16949.

Lesson 4 | DFMEA or PFMEA?

  • An explanation of the differences between a Design-FMEA and a Process-FMEA.

Lesson 5 | The FMEA Process

  • A preview of the 10 steps used to conduct an FMEA. The same basic steps apply to both a DFMEA and a PFMEA.

Lesson 6 | Assembling an FMEA Team

  • Helpful hints on assembling an effective FMEA team.

Unit 1 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 2 Process FMEAs

Lesson 1 | Process-FMEA Scope

  • How to clarify the scope for a PFMEA.
  • Details on how to use the PFMEA Scope Worksheet.

Lesson 2 | 10 Steps to Conduct a PFMEA

  • Step-by-step directions on conducting a PFMEA.
  • Guidance on the use of the FMEA Analysis Worksheet.
  • Techniques for customizing the Severity, Occurrence, and Detection Ranking Scales for a PFMEA.

Lesson 3 | PFMEAs and Control Plans

  • Using the PFMEA Analysis to develop a proactive Control Plan.

Lesson 4 | Getting More Out of Your PFMEA

  • Tips on the best times and places to conduct a PFMEA.
  • Tips on how to use the results of an FMEA to trigger continuous improvement.

Lesson 5 | PFMEA Example

  • An example of the application of a PFMEA, working through all 10 steps.

Unit 2 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

FMEA for Business Processes Course Objectives

Unit 1 | FMEA Overview

  • Explain the purpose of conducting an FMEA.
  • Describe the link between FMEAs and ISO 9001, TS 16949 and other quality standards.
  • Explain the methodology of the FMEA process.
  • Assemble an FMEA team.

Unit 2 | Process FMEAs

  • Clarify the scope of a PFMEA.
  • Work through the 10 steps of a PFMEA.
  • Develop custom ranking scales for Severity, Occurrence, and Detection.
  • Determine which technology tools to use as aids in your PFMEA action plan.
  • Link the PFMEA to a Control Plan.
  • Learn how to make the PFMEA into a living document.

Lean Manufacturing Course Outline

Unit 1 Lean Concepts

Lesson 1 | Why Lean?

  • Be customer focused: Be on-time, responsive, flexible, and fast.
  • Simplify and standardize workflows: Mimic continuous flow, minimize WIP, use visible measures.
  • Manage capacity: Increase process uptime, reduce set-up times, find "lost" capacity.
  • Eliminate waste: Identify non-value adding activities, then modify, combine, or eliminate those tasks.
  • JiT: Not too early and never late; not just-in-case inventory but just-in-time production and delivery; products must always be made right the first time; equipment must always work when needed.

Lesson 2 | Lean Terminology

  • Terms
  • Tools
  • Techniques

Lesson 3 | Eliminate Waste

  • Match lot sizes to customer demands: Use kanbans; end WIP.
  • Use pull scheduling instead of push scheduling.
  • Schedule to the rate-determining step (the bottleneck), then de-bottleneck process lines.
  • Facilitate fast feedback: Arrange sequential operations next to each other to ensure fast feedback from internal customer operations to internal supplier operations if something in-process is not right.

Lesson 4 | Components of Lean

  • Overview of the 8 Components of Lean: Value Stream Mapping, Workplace Organization, Predictability and Consistency, Set-up Reduction, TPM, Visual Factory, Support Processes, and Continuous Improvement.

Lesson 5 | Value Stream Analysis

  • Map the process from incoming order to outgoing product: Define process goals, create the current state map, and establish process metrics.
  • Use the current state map to identify potential improvements, conceive the future state.

Lesson 6 | The Lean Mindset

  • Eliminating waste is not limited to manufacturing; the same techniques apply to the office, sales, finance, maintenance, and even RandD processes and procedures.
  • Lean and Six Sigma are complementary.

Unit 1 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 2 Lean Practices

Lesson 1 | Streamlining the Value Stream

  • Identify process goals.
  • Collect and analyze process data.
  • Create a macro-facility workflow to determine how to minimize high volume travel distances.
  • Conduct a micro-process workflow to apply cellular concepts, identify and remove bottlenecks, and move to pull manufacturing with kanbans.

Lesson 2 | Workplace Organization

  • Apply the 5Ss: Sort (clearing the work area), Set in Order (designating locations), Shine (cleanliness and workplace appearance), Standardize (everyone doing things the same way), and Sustain (ingraining it in the culture).

Lesson 3 | Predictability and Consistency

  • Use DFA/DFM to design quality in.
  • Conduct GRandRs to ensure reliable measurement systems are in place.
  • Employ SPC to help ensure processes are predictable and stable.
  • Reduce variation and improve process capability with DOE.
  • Eliminate the root cause of defects using problem-solving and mistake-proofing.
  • Move to Six Sigma quality.

Lesson 4 | Set-Up Reduction

  • Apply SMED concepts.
  • Separate external tasks (external to the process) from internal tasks.

Lesson 5 | TPM

  • TPM versus PM
  • Develop operator involvement in the equipment and begin predictive maintenance practices.

Lesson 6 | Visual Workplace

  • Visual Workplace
  • Use status display of performance for dashboard or balanced measures and COQ results.
  • Visual controls, such as sensory alerts, indicate if something is out of place.
  • Marking on the floor, kanbans, andons, and panel-alarms all help build a visual control infrastructure.

Lesson 7 | Support Processes

  • Lean techniques require changes in Purchasing, Scheduling, Warehousing/Shipping, and Accounting practices.

Lesson 8 | Continuous Improvement

  • Fight NIH (not-invented-here) attitudes and leverage successes.
  • Use kaizen events for rapid, targeted improvements to achieve the future state.
  • Use a standardized Problem-Solving Model (e.g. DMAIC or 8D).
  • Begin an employee idea system.

Unit 2 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 3 Implementing Lean

Lesson 1 | Lean Starts with People

  • Lean Starts with People
  • Communicate the why, what, how, and who.
  • Provide education in the concepts.
  • Train employees in tools and techniques as needed to achieve a flexible workforce.

Lesson 2 | Data Drives Lean

  • Focus efforts on projects that lead to tangible savings.
  • Calculation techniques to generate data include: Time studies, equipment loading, TAKT time, staffing requirements, process yields, and COQ.
  • Sample Worksheets covered include: Lean Project Summary; Cell Target Worksheet; Data Collection Form for Basic Equipment and Utility Parameters; Value-Adding Analysis Worksheet; Process Change-Over/Setup Worksheet; Set-Up Reduction Worksheet; and Lot Size Worksheet.

Lesson 3 | Layout Options

  • Improved layouts are about moving cubic feet (not numbers of items), eliminating crossover points, arranging the process in the natural flow order; linking processes to minimize time and distance; moving equipment together to simulate a continuous process flow; and putting internal customers and suppliers next to each other.
  • Be careful to identify anchors or monuments; do not move them.
  • Typical layout options are explored.

Lesson 4 | Lean Inventory Practices

  • Minimize trips to and from the warehouse by designing the warehouse to work for you.
  • Use ABC inventory categories to prioritize inventory needs and storage locations.

Lesson 5 | Roadmap for Lean

  • Start with the people issues.
  • Focus on workplace organization (the 5S's), then, use value stream analysis and process workflow analysis to establish effective layouts.
  • Where to focus next depends on specific needs.
  • Use targeted Kaizen events to speed changes.
  • Do not overlook the need to modify support processes (especially scheduling and purchasing).

Lesson 6 | Lean Pitfalls

  • Not documenting the financial impact/savings.
  • Lack of commitment from leadership.
  • Using traditional purchasing practices.
  • Not changing scheduling techniques.
  • Failure to address workforce issues.
  • Not mistake-proofing the root cause.
  • Thinking Lean is just for manufacturing.
  • Not using beneficial technology.
  • Not leveraging successes.
  • Getting too lean.
  • Failure to hold the gains.

Unit 3 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Lean Manufacturing Course Objectives

Unit 1 | Lean Concepts

  • Understand the reasons for implementing lean.
  • Learn the terms, tools, and techniques used in lean.
  • Identify the types of waste that can be eliminated with lean.
  • Describe the components and elements of a lean effort.
  • Explain value stream mapping, techniques for analyzing the current state map and for envisioning the future state of the workflow.
  • Describe why and how lean can apply to finance, maintenance, sales and R&D processes.
  • Compare and contract the linkages and differences between lean and six sigma initiatives.

Unit 2 | Lean Practices

  • Streamlining the Value Stream: Learn how to use value stream maps to create macro-facility workflows and micro-process workflows.
  • Workplace Organization: Understand how the 5S's establish a structured approach for storing materials, supplies, and equipment in work areas.
  • Predictability & Consistency: Discover how quality improvement techniques such as GR&Rs, SPC, DOE, DFA/DFM, and (especially) mistake-proofing help prevent problems and lead to robust processes.
  • Set-Up Reduction: Investigate how to slash set-up and change-over times and understand how important fast set-ups are to lean efforts.
  • TPM: Learn how to improve equipment reliability by applying TPM methods.
  • Visual Workplace: See how visual controls and visual displays reinforce and enhances a lean effort.
  • Support Processes: Recognize how important lean scheduling, lean purchasing, lean accounting, and lean warehousing practices are to supporting and sustaining a lean manufacturing effort.
  • Continuous Improvement: Explore the options for keeping a lean effort viable and vital.

Unit 3 | Implementing Lean

  • Understand how important it is to address people issues as cross-training and flexible staffing practices are introduced.
  • Review the types and forms of data needed to support lean implementation.
  • Explore forms used to help plan and track lean efforts.
  • Investigate layout options and methods to determine the best option for your workflow and facility.
  • Learn how a lean warehouse complements lean manufacturing.
  • Review a systematic roadmap for introducing and implementing lean.
  • Explore 12 common lean pitfalls and learn how to avoid them.

Lean Business Processes Course Outline

Lesson 1 | Tackling Waste

  • Identify the seven wastes.
  • Explain value-adding versus non-value adding.
  • Define value from customer's perspectives.
  • Briefly describe how each of the seven wastes detracts value from a process.

Lesson 2 | Process Mapping

  • Define the bounds of a workflow.
  • Use a variety of process (workflow) mapping techniques.
  • Identity hand-offs, disconnects, incomplete communication and rework loops as non-value-adding components (or waste.)
  • Plan improvements to workflows.
  • Consider a move from batch processing to continuous (or one-piece) flow.

Lesson 3 | Streamline the Process

  • Know what Takt Time means.
  • Identify process bottlenecks.
  • Calculate Process Cycle Efficiency.
  • Understand how to balance workloads within a process workflow.
  • Calculate First Pass Yield.
  • Be familiar with workflow and work station layout considerations.

Lesson 4 | 5S's in the Office

  • Identify each of the 5S's.
  • Know how to clear clutter from a work area.
  • Explain the rationale for selecting effective designated storage locations.
  • Understand how to maintain the work area's appearance and use preventive measures to keep it clean.
  • Describe what it means to standardize and why standardization is important.
  • Know how to use audits to sustain workplace organization and to prevent backsliding.

Lesson 5 | Error-Proofing Overview

  • Understand the error-proofing mindset.
  • Be aware of common error-proofing techniques.
  • Comprehend the Transaction Model (consisting of the server-side and customer-side.)
  • Know how to use basic root cause analysis tools.

Lesson 6 | TPM for Business Processes

  • Be aware of TPM's impact on the Seven Wastes.
  • Recognize TPM's influence on reliability and uptime of business process support systems.
  • Begin measuring Overall Equipment Effectiveness.

Lesson 7 | Lean Business Process Measures

  • Measure Lean efforts by tracking Process Cycle Efficiency trends.
  • Create a Balanced Scorecard to track waste reduction.
  • Audit 5S activities to maintain workplace organization momentum.
  • Monitor uptime, throughput rates and yields using Overall Equipment Effectiveness.
  • Develop two-dimensional surveys to gather meaningful customer feedback.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this course.

Lean Business Processes Course Objectives

  • Understand the Seven Wastes and be able to actively support efforts to reduce them.
  • Recognize value-added from the customer's perspective.
  • Use Brown-Paper Flowcharts, Workflow Diagrams and Value Stream Maps to document current processes.
  • "Question" workflows to identify non-value-adding activities and tasks.
  • Develop a plan to simplify and streamline workflows.
  • Support a 5S effort in their work area.
  • Understand the power of error-proofing to prevent future problems.
  • Assist a Business Process TPM effort.
  • Be able to track macro measures of the Lean initiative.

Advanced SPC Course Outline

Unit 1 Advanced Control Charting

Lesson 1 | Setting Up Variable Control Charts

  • Calculating control limits and establishing a baseline chart.

Lesson 2 | Setting Up Attribute Control Charts

  • Setting up p, np, c, and u charts.

Lesson 3 | More Patterns of Instability

  • Explanations of Western Electric, AIAG, Nelson, and Boeing rules.

Lesson 4 | Setting Up Individuals and Moving Range Control Charts

  • Calculating control limits and establishing a baseline chart for IX and MR Charts.

Lesson 5 | Special Control Charts and Applications

  • Variations on the standard variable data control charts.

Unit Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 2 Advanced Process Capability

Lesson 1 | Conducting a Process Capability Study

  • How-to conduct a process capability study.

Lesson 2 | Taking Action to Improve the Process

  • What to do if the process is not capable.

Lesson 3 | More Capability Indices

  • Pp and Ppk
  • Differences between Ppk and Cpk.
  • Cpm and Ppm

Lesson 4 | Process Capability Study Complications

  • Using individuals instead of subgroups
  • Compensating for tool wear
  • Skewed distributions
  • One-sided specs
  • Short Run processes

Lesson 5 | Six Sigma Capability

  • What is meant by Six Sigma Quality.
  • How to use Z-values.

Unit Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Advanced SPC Course Objectives

Unit 1 | Advanced Control Charting

  • Set up an x-bar and R control chart.
  • Interpret the control chart to determine if a process is stable.
  • Set up an attribute (p, np, c, or u) control chart.
  • Understand how to use the most common tests of instability.
  • Set up an Individuals and Moving Range control chart.
  • Explore options to the conventional x-bar and R control chart.
  • Select the most appropriate alternative format for a variable control chart.

Unit 2 | Advanced Process Capability

  • Prepare for and conduct a process capability study.
  • Use the results of a process capability study to improve the capability of the process.
  • Learn what to do if the process capability cannot be improved enough to meet the customer's requirements.
  • Know the differences between Ppk & Cpk.
  • Know how to handle process capability study complications and challenges.
  • Explain what Six Sigma Quality means.
  • Be able to use Z-values.

Measurement Systems Analysis Course Outline

Unit 1 Analyzing Measurement System Variation

Lesson 1 | Variation in Measurement Systems

  • A review of sources of measurement system variation.
  • An explanation of Type A and Type B evaluations of measurement uncertainty.
  • Exploration of the effects of too much variation on measurements.

Lesson 2 | Measurement System Linearity

  • How to measure gage/instrument linearity (both graphically and mathematically) to determine if a gage (or instrument) has linearity problems.
  • Taking action to deal with linearity problems.

Lesson 3 | Measurement System Stability

  • How to evaluate gage/instrument stability using a control chart. Taking action to deal with stability problems.

Lesson 4 | Repeatability & Reproducibility

  • How to conduct a GR&R study.
  • R&R analysis for non-destructive measurements.
  • Use of ANOVA for GR&Rs.
  • R&R analysis for destructive measurements.
  • R&R analysis for attribute measurements.
  • Graphical techniques to analyze R&R.

Lesson 5 | Improving Measurement Systems

  • Using a problem-solving approach to find the root causes of repeatability and reproducibility problems.
  • Using the GR&R data to help direct the problem-solving effort.
  • A description of some basic causes to investigate if gage/instrument repeatability is high.
  • A description of some basic causes to investigate if appraiser reproducibility is high.

Lesson 6 | MSA Software Considerations

  • Suggested selection criteria for features of software programs for analyzing GR&R studies.
  • An overview of some of the advanced measurement system analysis tools that a GR&R software package may have.

Unit 1 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this Unit.

Unit 2 Managing Measurement Systems

Lesson 1 | Formal Instruments Management

  • Why a gage/instrument calibration program is so important and makes good business sense.
  • Why a gage/instrument may not be accurate.
  • The components of a gage/instrument management system.

Lesson 2 | Sources of Measurement Error

  • Measurement errors due to gage/instrument calibration deficiencies.
  • Measurement error related to gage/instrument usage or damage.
  • Errors of judgment resulting in measurement errors.
  • GR&R issues and measurement error.

Lesson 3 | Calibration Practices

  • A discussion of common calibration practices.
  • Key elements of a calibration system as defined by ISO 10012-1.
  • Gage/instrument identification techniques.
  • Sources for calibration procedures and independent calibration laboratories.
  • Methods for determining intervals of calibration.

Lesson 4 | Calibration Standards & Tools

  • Traceability of calibration standards from primary national standards to working standards.
  • The role of transfer standards and working standards.
  • Measurement uncertainty and the calibration system.

Lesson 5 | Calibration Pitfalls

  • Common instrument management system pitfalls.
  • Proactive techniques to steer your organization clear of these pitfalls.

Lesson 6 | Records & Audits

  • Different types of records needed for a comprehensive instrument management system.
  • The role of audits to ensure your instrument management system is working.

Lesson 7 | Calibration Software Considerations

  • Benefits of using instrument management software.
  • Suggested selection criteria of software features for an instrument management software program.

Unit 2 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this Unit.

Measurement Systems Analysis Course Objectives

Unit 1 | Analyzing Measurement System Variation

In this unit, you will cover the techniques for analyzing the variation contained within a measurement system itself. After completing this Unit, you should be able to:

  • Know the common sources of measurement system variation.
  • Understand both Type A and Type B evaluations of measurement uncertainty.
  • Use both graphical and mathematical techniques to evaluate gage or instrument linearity and stability, and initiate action to address linearity or stability issues.
  • Know how to plan and conduct a GR&R study.
  • Perform R&R analysis for non-destructive measurements, for destructive measurements, and for attribute measurements.
  • Use ANOVA and graphical techniques for the R&R analysis.
  • Use the GR&R data to initiate action to improve the measurement device's repeatability and reproducibility.

Unit 2 | Managing Measurement Systems

In this unit you will learn about the importance of measurement device calibration management. Upon completion of this unit you will be able to:

  • Explain the importance of calibration and management.
  • Describe the primary sources of measurement error.
  • Show how the calibration of a measurement device is tied to ISO standards.
  • Specify your requirements for measurement instrument management software, if you choose to computerize your records.

DOE Screening Experiments Course Outline

Unit 1 Background for DOE

Lesson 1 | Why DOE?

  • Limitations of OATs (one-at-a-time) experimentation.
  • How designed experiments overcome the limitations of OATs and are a more effective and efficient way to characterize and improve processes and products.

Lesson 2 | DOE Terminology

  • An explanation of the key terms used in designed experiments.

Lesson 3 | Types of Designed Experiments

  • Full Factorials
  • Fractional Factorials
  • Screening Experiments
  • Response Surface Analysis
  • EVOP
  • Mixture Experiments

Lesson 4 | Tests of Significance

  • Alpha and Beta Risks
  • Degrees of Freedom
  • Hypothesis Tests
  • t-Tests
  • F-Tests

Lesson 5 | Setting Up a Designed Experiment

  • Design & Communicate the Objective
  • Define the Process
  • Select a Response and Measurement System
  • Select Factors to be Studied
  • Select the Experimental Design
  • Set Factor Levels
  • Final Design Considerations

Unit 1 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 2 Plackett-Burman Experiments

Lesson 1 | Plackett-Burman Matrices

  • The derivation of Plackett-Burman designs.
  • Types of Plackett-Burman matrices.
  • Ways to determine the experimental error.
  • Techniques for analyzing experimental results.

Lesson 2 | Calculating Statistical Significance

  • Multiple techniques for testing the statistical significance of factor effects.
  • Using graphical techniques to analyze responses and interactions.

Lesson 3 | Calculating a Prediction Equation

  • Developing a prediction equation using factor effects.
  • Using the prediction equation to optimize the process or product.

Lesson 4 | Analyzing for Effect on Variation

  • How to analyze variation as a response.
  • Creating a scree diagram to graphically analyze factor effects on variation.

Lesson 5 | When Bad Things Happen to Good Experiments

  • The need for good planning to prevent problems.
  • Some techniques for salvaging an experiment if data are lost or suspect.

Unit 2 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

Unit 3 Taguchi Techniques

Lesson 1 | Taguchi Concepts

  • The concept of robustness.
  • The Taguchi Loss Function.
  • Signal to noise ratios.

Lesson 2 | Taguchi Matrices

  • Taguchi designs for two-level experiments.
  • Use of Taguchi Interaction Tables.

Lesson 3 | Taguchi Experimental Analysis

  • Multiple techniques for testing the statistical significance of factor effects.
  • Using graphical techniques to analyze responses and interactions.

Lesson 4 | Determining Where to Set Factors

  • Developing a prediction equation.
  • Use the mean, signal to noise ratio, and variation effects to determine where to set factors.

Lesson 5 | When Bad Things Happen to Good Experiments

  • The need for good planning to prevent problems.
  • Some techniques for salvaging an experiment if data are lost or suspect.

Unit 3 Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this unit.

DOE Screening Experiments Course Objectives

Unit 1 | Background for DOE

  • Why design of experiments (DOE) are more efficient and effective than one-at-a-time (OAT) experimentation.
  • What the major terms used in designed experiments mean.
  • Types of designed experiments and when they are best used.
  • How to use basic tests of significance.
  • How to plan a designed experiment.

Unit 2 | Plackett-Burman Techniques

  • How Plackett-Burman designs were derived.
  • How to determine which Plackett-Burman matrix to use for your application.
  • How to estimate the experimental error in Plackett-Burman experiments.
  • How to analyze experimental results and calculate the statistical significance of factor effects.
  • How to develop a prediction equation that can be used to optimize the response.
  • How to salvage experiments if data are lost.

Unit 3 | Taguchi Techniques

  • Why Taguchi techniques focus on the robustness of the product.
  • How the Quality (Taguchi) Loss Function is used.
  • How to calculate and use Signal to Noise ratios.
  • How Taguchi designs were derived.
  • How to determine which Taguchi design to use for your application.
  • How to use Taguchi interaction tables.
  • How to test the statistical significance of factor effects.
  • How to develop a prediction equation that can be used to optimize the response.
  • How to use mean, S/N, and variation effects to determine where to set factors.
  • How to salvage experiments if data are lost.

Root Cause Analysis with Corrective Action Course Outline

Introduction | Root Cause Analysis Overview

  • Overview of Root Cause Analysis
  • Preview of Lessons 1 through 4

Lesson 1 | Setting Up Variable Control Charts

  • Form a Team
  • Focus the Team
  • Understand the Problem

Lesson 2 | Setting Up Attribute Control Charts

  • Create a cause & effect diagram
  • Explore chains of causes
  • Study interrelationships
  • Use data analysis & investigative tools
  • Identify root causes

Lesson 3 | More Patterns of Instability

  • Propose potential solutions
  • Select the "best" solution
  • Conduct a reality test
  • Develop Action Plan to implement solution
  • Verify the solution

Lesson 4 | Setting Up Individuals & Moving Range Control Charts

  • Validate the solution
  • Update documentation
  • Train
  • Start audits
  • Transfer knowledge

Lesson 5 | Special Control Charts & Applications

  • 10 barriers to Root Causes Analysis with potential remedies

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this course.

Root Cause Analysis with Corrective Action Course Objectives

  • Establish an effective team environment.
  • Clarify what the problem is and is not.
  • Start a trail to the root cause starting with symptoms of the problem.
  • Use data and investigative tools to identify the root cause.
  • Employ decision matrices to select the most appropriate solution.
  • Initiate measure to ensure the gains made are held.
  • Recognize common barriers to root cause analysis and apply techniques to overcome those barriers.

Role of a Lean Six Sigma Champion Course Outline

Lesson 1 | What Does a Champion Do?

  • Conduct a self-assessment to determine if you are a good candidate to fill the role of a champion.
  • Explore the six basic roles of a champion.
  • Gain an understanding of how to fulfill basic champion roles.

Lesson 2 | Support Systems for Champions

  • Examine a typical supporting infrastructure for champions.
  • Consider forms and checklists used to formalize support systems.

Lesson 3 | Pitfalls to Avoid

  • Investigate seven of the most common pitfalls champions must deal with.
  • Explore remedies to the pitfalls.

Challenge

  • An assessment of the learner's progress in this course.

Role of a Lean Six Sigma Champion Course Objectives

  • Successfully support your staff's lean six sigma efforts.
  • Overcome challenges to successful lean six sigma implementation.
  • Monitor and nurture lean six sigma projects.